What is your best advice for starting to transition into ethical veganism? - VeggieBoards

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#1 Old 10-08-2016, 11:12 AM
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Lightbulb What is your best advice for starting to transition into ethical veganism?

Salutations, everyone! I'm finally back again!

I have had a lot of issues going on and money has been really tight, so I temporarily gave into the omnivore life again. I'm happy to be getting back on track now. (Even though money is still quite tight.)

I want to be a full-fledged ethical vegan, but I think it will be best if I go towards this goal in stages.

First, I'd like to slowly start switching back to an all vegan diet, but I plan on slowly making more vegan choices and gathering/practicing vegan recipes for the rest of 2016; then on New Year's Day I want to start eating completely vegan. (Or, if I have to settle, then I at least have a really good grasp on what I should and should not eat and have heavily cut out non-vegan foods.)

After New Year's Day, I want to start putting more emphasis into buying vegan products and everything else that goes with. I will try to do this some now, but I don't want to overwhelm myself.

I truly appreciate any and all advice,
Tues ♥


P.S. If you can't figure out how to simplify what you would like to share, feel free to just tell your story. I promise I will take the time to read it.
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#2 Old 10-08-2016, 11:46 AM
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Welcome back!

I just posted this article in another thread but it has a lot of great tips for saving money on a vegan diet: http://plantbasedonabudget.com/7-way...-of-dead-prez/

Also be sure to check out our Frugal Living forum and our articles on transitioning to veganism:

http://www.veggieboards.com/forum/55-frugal-living/

http://www.veggieboards.com/index.ph...style-Articles

I hope that helps! Just take it one day at a time and get used to eating more and more vegan meals and you'll do great.

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without harming others... why wouldn't we?" - Edgars Mission
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#3 Old 10-09-2016, 07:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tues View Post
Salutations, everyone! I'm finally back again!

I have had a lot of issues going on and money has been really tight, so I temporarily gave into the omnivore life again. I'm happy to be getting back on track now. (Even though money is still quite tight.)

I want to be a full-fledged ethical vegan, but I think it will be best if I go towards this goal in stages.

First, I'd like to slowly start switching back to an all vegan diet, but I plan on slowly making more vegan choices and gathering/practicing vegan recipes for the rest of 2016; then on New Year's Day I want to start eating completely vegan. (Or, if I have to settle, then I at least have a really good grasp on what I should and should not eat and have heavily cut out non-vegan foods.)

After New Year's Day, I want to start putting more emphasis into buying vegan products and everything else that goes with. I will try to do this some now, but I don't want to overwhelm myself.

I truly appreciate any and all advice,
Tues ♥


P.S. If you can't figure out how to simplify what you would like to share, feel free to just tell your story. I promise I will take the time to read it.

Hi Tues,

Welcome back!

As far as simplifying the vegan diet goes, I think that this Vegetarian Starter Guide (it's actually vegan) does a really nice job: http://www.mercyforanimals.org/files/VSG.pdf On page 13, it neatly summarizes vegan nutrition. The guide also has very easy meal ideas.

As long as you avoid vegan specialty foods and overpriced luxury markets (like Whole Foods Market), eating vegan should save you money. Can you tell us which vegan items are expensive for you in your area?

Replacing meat with beans and grains is a huge money saver. If you go to the "dry beans" section of any supermarket, you'll find a treasure trove of different beans, at very low prices. Certain whole grains, like brown rice and oatmeal, can also be bought very cheaply. You don't need to choose overpriced grains, like quinoa.


Walmart brand! Cheap!






Very cheap vitamin B12 supplements can be found at your local pharmacy. Our local Southern California pharmacy, CVS pharmacy, sells 120-tablet bottles of 1500 mcg, berry-flavored vitamin B12 tablets for $7.49: http://www.cvs.com/shop/vitamins/vit...-prodid-932050 . At 2 tablets per week, this is a 60-week supply for $7.



Affordable vegan vitamin D supplements can be more difficult to find - I buy mine online. Amazon.com has 60-capsule bottles of 2500 IU vegan vitamin D3 capsules for $7.88: https://www.amazon.com/Doctors-Best-...amin%2Bd3&th=1 . At 2 or 3 capsules per week, this is a 20-30 week supply for $8.



Here are vitamin / mineral recommendations for vegans, from VeganHealth.org: http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/dailyrecs

_________

“Under the twinkling trees was a table covered with Guatemalan fabric, roses in juice jars, wax rose candles from Tijuana and plates of food — Weetzie's Vegetable Love-Rice, My Secret Agent Lover Man's guacamole, Dirk's homemade pizza, Duck's fig and berry salad and Surfer Surprise Protein Punch, Brandy-Lynn's pink macaroni, Coyote's cornmeal cakes, Ping's mushu plum crepes and Valentine's Jamaican plantain pie."

from Witch Baby, Francesca Lia Block, 1991

Last edited by David3; 10-09-2016 at 10:15 AM.
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#4 Old 10-09-2016, 10:17 AM
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Hi Tues,

I can't resist showing you this video about cooking beans on the stove. The guy doing the video is not vegan, but he really shows how simple it is to cook beans. "Regular-size" beans need about 2-1/2 hours of simmering (much faster in a pressure cooker), but lentil beans only need about 30-45 minutes to cook.

P.S.: Ignore his advice to buy "Casserole" brand beans - those are the MOST expensive dry beans I've ever seen. He must be getting a little product endorsement money from them.

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_________

“Under the twinkling trees was a table covered with Guatemalan fabric, roses in juice jars, wax rose candles from Tijuana and plates of food — Weetzie's Vegetable Love-Rice, My Secret Agent Lover Man's guacamole, Dirk's homemade pizza, Duck's fig and berry salad and Surfer Surprise Protein Punch, Brandy-Lynn's pink macaroni, Coyote's cornmeal cakes, Ping's mushu plum crepes and Valentine's Jamaican plantain pie."

from Witch Baby, Francesca Lia Block, 1991

Last edited by David3; 10-09-2016 at 10:23 AM.
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#5 Old 10-09-2016, 12:10 PM
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My approach was to first of all read a lot on the subject to have a strong knowledge especially on the ethical position.

Then I've tried to eliminate things one by one roughly in order of how much cruelty they cause. While doing this I read more to learn about nutrition over time.

Firstly, in January, eliminated from my diet all meat, fish and eggs.
In February, eliminated cheese, milk, butter etc.
Later I extended to toiletries and started thinking about clothes. If that's too much for now you can always just focus on food for now, at least for this year.
Later I started to eliminate or reduce other food products that contain diary or eggs in them, such as cake and milk chocolate.

I'm doing well so far, so I hope you can as well.

A strict vegan diet will be more expensive perhaps as you need specialist foods, but start with a mostly vegan diet. Just replacing meat with some cheap lentils, beans, more rice, pasta etc, should not be more expensive. If money is an issue you will have to cut back on specialist vegan foods perhaps and certain things but it can be done.
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#6 Old 10-10-2016, 12:50 PM
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Thank you so much, everyone! I've read the articles you linked too (and others on those sites) and I bought some books on vegan living as well. I'm trying to go into this as knowledgeable as possible and all your support means so much to me.

I will have to get back to you on which vegan items are expensive for me in my area, because unfortunately my anxiety has been so bad I've been self-isolating for quite awhile.
I'm starting to fight back again and get back to the life I want to lead though.

Thanks again!
Tues
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#7 Old 10-10-2016, 06:13 PM
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I don't suppose you have an Aldi? I can offer tons of tips for Aldi.
Right now they have organic quinoa for $2.99!
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#8 Old 10-10-2016, 08:11 PM
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I don't suppose you have an Aldi? I can offer tons of tips for Aldi.
Right now they have organic quinoa for $2.99!
There's an Aldi in the town where I go to college is.
I would love to hear your tips.
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#9 Old 10-11-2016, 03:22 AM
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Hi Tues and welcome back!

Being vegan does not have to be incredibly expensive if you keep it simple.

For cleaning products, you can make some of your own stuff. I use a mixture of white vinegar diluted with water to clean mirrors and windows. I use washing soda for my bathtub and even just a little in my toilet (as well as a tiny bit of tea tree oil as a disinfectant). I use lemon juice to clean tough greasy spots. I do use Seventh Generation brand (look for labels such as all plant based and no animal testing) for dishes and laundry soap. It is relatively easy to find in grocery stores. It may be just slightly more expensive than your common dish liquids and soaps but a little goes a long way. I use Kirks Castile bar soap which also isn't that expensive and I have been able to find it in larger chain groceries, and Dr. Bronners liquid soap can be used for your hair and double as a body wash or cleaning solution for all purpose cleaning. Health food stores and camping stores carry it. I can make one medium sized bottle last three months. I wash my hair every two or three days, but I do have very short hair.

I don't wear makeup or put anything other than soap in my hair so I don't spend much on toiletries. No hairspray, dyes, that sort of thing so I save a good bit of money right there.

I buy clothing second hand mostly give or take a few special items. I have spent money on quality vegan hiking boots/shoes online but they have lasted me for a number of years now. I also shop through amazon.com and watch prices because they go up and down. I will make my purchase when the price falls. I have also bought a pair or two of work type dress shoes from Payless shoe stores that are all man made materials and very cheap. A lot of trail and running shoes are naturally or "accidentally" vegan as well now.

As far as food, I don't buy a ton of processed foods, but enjoy a few here and there. I don't even buy vegan butter but a few times a year if that. Most recipes that call for vegan butter you can substitute with oil or peanut/nut butter or leave out the fat and use a food like banana, applesauce, pumpkin, tofu etc. For toasts, I will often spread on peanut butter, or tomato paste, or apple compote (I chop and peel fresh apples and warm on the stove in a pan with a little water and spices to make a soft apple compote). Sometimes I make a bean dip and spread that on toast.

For me, beans are a staple. I eat them daily in several servings, and they are as cheap as you can get for a quality protein source. Lentils are excellent and require no soaking. Most beans can also be bought in a can if time is an issue and you don't want to soak and cook dried beans. I make a batch of dried cooked beans on a Sunday and freeze them for use during the week.

Buy in bulk: Beans; grains such as rice, oats, couscous, quinoa, millet, buckwheat, barley, wheat berries etc.; flours; flaxseeds (to use for flax "eggs", in baking or on hot cereal etc); some seeds are not too expensive if you buy just a little and in bulk such as chia seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds; even pasta can be bought in bulk but is generally very cheap. Think whole wheat spaghetti, macaroni, penne pasta etc.

Learn to make your own bread and make two loaves at a time on a slow day and freeze one. I do this and save a ton of money, because vegan breads such as Food for Life or Ezekiel or Rudis organic bakery brands can be expensive. Once you really get a good bread recipe and get good at making it, it becomes second nature and no big deal. There are very few ingredients involved in making homemade bread.

Condiments and spices/seasonings are also key to making a good homemade simple meal without buying designer items. Some common condiments and staples I keep on hand: applesauce, cider vinegar, balsamic vinegar; liquid smoke, soy sauce (actually tastes really good over plain popcorn as an alternative to butter and salt), jars of salsa, blackstrap molasses (surprisingly very high in calcium and iron), cans of tomato paste, sauce, and diced tomatoes; extra virgin cold pressed olive oil or coconut oil (not that cheap but a little goes a LONG way); shredded coconut (can be bought cheaper in bulk); canned full fat or light coconut milk (great for making curries, for baking in place of condensed milk and for making your own vegan whipped topping); raisins or dried cranberries; dijon mustard; peanut butter with nothing else in it (just peanuts); sundried tomatoes; vegetable stock or broth; lemon juice (or fresh lemons) and lime juice.

Some spices I commonly use: garlic powder or garlic cloves and a good garlic mincer; cumin; chili powder; cayenne; ground mustard; sage; marjoram; curry powder; oregano; parsley, basil; lemon peel; nutmeg; cinnamon; ginger powder; pumpkin spice; harder to find but also excellent are turmeric; cardemom; caraway seeds; garam masala, coriander.

I make a "ground beef" base for recipes by cooking Bulgar wheat (cooks very quickly and if you can find Bob's Red Mill or Arrowhead Mills brands you can find it and it is a cheaper grain). I add a small can of tomato paste and cooked red lentils (red lentils also cook very quickly) to my Bulgar wheat and then spices that suite the dish. For example, I make it for hard shell corn tacos and add taco seasonings (cumin, chili powder, garlic powder, paprika, or an organic taco seasoning mix) and salsa. It looks scarily like ground beef, same texture and color, and has a similar flavoring but obviously without the grease, fat, and cholesterol. For sloppy joes, I do the base...bulgar wheat, tomato paste, red lentils...and add organic catsup (Amy's brand is vegan but most organic catsups are vegan) and molasses to the mix as well as a squirt of lime juice and some chopped onion and green bell pepper. For spaghetti sauce, again I make the base, then add oregano, garlic powder, mushrooms, zucchini, green bell pepper and heap over spaghetti for a high protein textured sauce.

Potatoes and sweet potatoes are also a staple for me. Sometimes a meal is as simple as simmering some kale or collard greens, can of black beans, and chopped peeled (or leave skin on) sweet potato. I add a little coconut milk or shredded coconut and curry powder for a simple quick and filling meal.

A few "designer" vegan condiments I keep around are Just Mayo or Vegannaise for making sandwiches. Some sandwiches I make: mash a can of chickpeas (or 1.5 cup dried cooked) in a bowl. Just flatten them down some but leave some texture and shape. Add some chopped celery and onion, and then a dollop of vegan mayonnaise. Sprinkle some black pepper in there and mix all the ingredients thoroughly to mix the mayo well. Add this spread to three or four sandwiches for a vegan version of egg salad, called chickpea salad sandwich. This also works well with pasta for a cold macaroni salad with vegan mayo, chopped celery and onion, and whole chickpeas. Peanut butter and banana sandwiches are great too (you can even leave out the bread and use a collard leaf or kale leaf or two and add your peanut butter and banana in it and roll it up). I make a white bean dip by blending a can of white beans (or 1.5 cups cooked) with a squirt of lemon juice, black pepper, chopped green onion, and garlic. I spread the bean dip on some bread and add sliced tomato for a sandwich. Sometimes a sandwich can be as simple as sliced avocado and sliced tomato with a little vegan mayo or a ring of onion. If you are into bagels, there are some vegan friendly commercial bagels that are not that expensive, like some Thomas bagels are vegan (New York Style plain). Some tortillas are also vegan. I like Staceys organic tortillas (very few ingredients) though I can only find them at Whole Foods Coops. Making your own tortillas is very easy with a cheap tortilla press. I make corn flour tortillas too. All you need is flour and water to make a cornflour tortilla, and corn flour is very cheap.

Inexpensive breakfasts can be beans on toast with salsa; or peanut butter on toast and a banana; or oatmeal and fresh or frozen heated fruit (I often use fruit in place of any sugar). Rolled oats can be eaten cold with plant milk, fresh or dried fruit, and add some seeds like sunflower to round it out. Pancakes can be made easily without eggs with additions like canned pumpkin (very inexpensive), banana, apple sauce etc. adding a little cider vinegar or lemon juice to a cup of plant milk will make "buttermilk" and this makes pancakes fluffier and makes them rise more with the addition of baking soda in the recipe. I use fruit compote on top of my pancakes which is cheaper than pure maple syrup. I make a fruit compote by heating frozen berries in a sauce pan with a pinch of water, maybe some molasses added for sweetener, and a little cornstarch. Once it begins to heat and the berries break down, stir and it makes a thick sauce. Adding a little plant milk makes it richer yet.

If you want to keep your lifestyle simple and affordable, you will need to learn to prepare your foods (and other items) and manage time for these things. I put aside an hour or two on Sundays to make things that take a long time...wild rice or other long cooking grains, dried beans, breads, stuff for lunchs for my work week. That way I don't have to spend a lot of time during my busy work week doing these things. My days are long and I am gone from my house from 6am to 5pm every day. Having my lunches prepared ahead and freezing stuff I make on Sunday helps me to throw together a simple healthy dinner in the evenings when I am too tired and short on time to make a big fancy meal. I cook and/or prepare all of my meals daily, rarely eat out and rarely buy premade vegan food. Fridays are generally my "lazy day" where I might just throw together a garden salad and popcorn for dinner, or might buy an Amy's frozen vegan burrito here and there. About once a month or two I might buy a vegan meat or cheese product like Daiya shredds or Field Roast vegan Sausage or Beyond Meat vegan chi*kn strips. They are treats, not a staple, and I really don't miss them much. I buy tofu and tempeh more often, which are no more expensive than most higher quality meats. On occasion I make homemade vegan mayo or "cream cheese" by blending cashews, maple syrup, lemon juice etc in my Blentec or a food processer. Again I do this rarely because it is expensive and is a treat. My "cheese" sauces are often a matter of blending steamed carrots or sweet potato with white beans or tofu and a few spices and plant milk for a creamy sauce.

If you can find a decent food processor or seed grinder, this will help a lot for stuff like grinding flaxseeds for ground flaxseed (very handy for baking and make "flax eggs"). You can also buy already ground flaxseeds too, but I find buying the whole seed in bulk much cheaper and fresher.

Also, utilize a crockpot if you have one! Great for making overnight hot cereals and big batches of soups, bean dishes etc for a week of meals. Find a good vegan crockpot chili recipe! And steel cut oats with chopped apple and cinnamon or millet and chopped apple and cinnamon simmering in a crockpot overnight is great to wake up to!

Finally, a steamer basket is an excellent time saver! I can peel chop and steam sweet potatoes or russet potatoes in fifteen or twenty minutes and have soft potatoes for mashing or eating as is or adding to other cooked foods. it is so much faster than baking them in the oven for a whole hour. Same with carrots and other hard vegetables. I can have soft steamed carrots, asparagus, broccoli etc in a matter of ten minutes with a steamer basket. Definitely worth investing in! I spent maybe $20 on a great steamer basket and lid and have used it countless times.

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#10 Old 10-13-2016, 12:43 AM
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Well for starters, being vegetarian has been proven to be cheaper than being omni, so if money is your excuse for not going vegan, start out being a lacto, or lacto-ovo vegetarian. Invest in pasture raised eggs (not free range, not cage free but pasture raised) which is the most ethical way to eat eggs. Goats milk and cheese is more environmentally sustainable than cows milk/cheese.

If money and ethics are your main concerns, start there and work your way towards veganism as you learn.

If eating beans and rice all the time freaks you out, remember you can also get canned vegetarian refried beans, and eat with sautéed onions and bell pepper or salsa on tortilla or toast, maybe with guacamole or avacado. Try eating quinoa spaghetti with mushrooms sauteed in olive oil and marinara sauce. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are vegan as long as the bread is. Lentils can be really delicious with vegan margarine and pasta, and perhaps some kale or peas mixed in, with garlic salt. Spanish rice is a yummy alternative to plain rice, or grab a box of red beans and rice and spice it up with hot sauce. You can mix nuts or seeds into oatmeal and eat with cinnamon, sugar or stevia, and soy milk. Try Asian and Mediterranean foods, which can be super affordable as well as tasty, and either naturally vegan, or easy to make vegan (say with tofu instead of meat, or by eating falafel with tahini and eggplant instead of gyros).

Flax, hemp, walnuts and chia are all vegan sources of Omega 3s, so don't panic about fish (you won't miss the mercury).

"Thinkers may prepare revolutions, but bandits must carry them out"~
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#11 Old 10-13-2016, 09:28 PM
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Good luck and good for you. My advice is to tell any naysayers to, uh, er.....Booger off if they give you any slack. (Can I say booger off in here)?
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#12 Old 10-15-2016, 09:22 AM
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Good luck and good for you. My advice is to tell any naysayers to, uh, er.....Booger off if they give you any slack. (Can I say booger off in here)?
Of course! Boogers are vegan, at least in the United States.
.
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_________

“Under the twinkling trees was a table covered with Guatemalan fabric, roses in juice jars, wax rose candles from Tijuana and plates of food — Weetzie's Vegetable Love-Rice, My Secret Agent Lover Man's guacamole, Dirk's homemade pizza, Duck's fig and berry salad and Surfer Surprise Protein Punch, Brandy-Lynn's pink macaroni, Coyote's cornmeal cakes, Ping's mushu plum crepes and Valentine's Jamaican plantain pie."

from Witch Baby, Francesca Lia Block, 1991
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#13 Old 10-15-2016, 11:52 AM
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Cool

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Of course! Boogers are vegan, at least in the United States.
.
Thanks.

Anytime I think I'm perfect, I remember that my cousin lives on an island, and I've never walked over to visit her.
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#14 Old 10-15-2016, 04:56 PM
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I just want to thank you all so much for all the advice, encouragement, and kind words.

I should probably mention that starting next month money won't be as big of a concern for me. (I naturally don't eat a lot 'cause I get full super fast anyway.) I just want to make sure I'm being smart about my purchases, especially for someone just now returning to veganism.

My biggest concern is remembering how to transition the healthy way. I'm rereading a lot of materials, but I want to be well prepared and a good example to others I may influence.

I hope one day to offer others advice and encouragement like you have all given me.
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#15 Old 10-15-2016, 05:13 PM
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Aldi has their Simply nature (or simply organic?) quinoa for $2.99 a pound bag! I had bought a few the last time and still have a bag in the fridge. Really good price!
I always find their dried beans and lentils fresh and priced well.
I get fresh bagged spinach, baby kale, as well as salad greens. Look for their specials on produce.
I go on Tues when they'll put their 'specials' on special. I've gotten cases of things like organic chili beans, other organic beans, tomatoes with habenaros, for 39 cents a can. Their green enchilada sauce is really good. I get the corn torillas, beans, taco shells, tomatoes, fat free refried beans, salsa

I have many of Aldis brands of 'stuff' too!
stainless steel 6 quart pressure cooker
Median brand (lenovo) external computer hard drive
steam mop
stick vacuum
rechargable stick LED light
big colander
But the very best is the Nutribullet copy I got around last Nov-Dec for $30. It's exactly the same!
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#16 Old 10-22-2016, 05:45 PM
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If you can, growing some of your own vegetables helps.
Nutritionally speaking, as long as you get fortified sources of B12 (soy milk, almond milk, fortified cereals) your B12 will be fine. Choline is only an issue for Vegan with the wrong food allergies. Most Vegans should get enough Choline (from Oregon State). I don't, so I mention this. Brussel Sprouts, Broccoli, soy, wheat, beets, rice are all good sources. I only take choline supplement on days I don't eat enough soy, beets and rice. Vitamin D is usually an issue for anyone in the winter months who don't get enough sun.

Flax seed and Chia seeds provides the omega-3s we need. Vegan Society balancing Omega 3 vs Omega 6 intake pdf.

Omega 5 and 7: Pomegranate seeds and oil has a good source of Omega 5 (and the only known botanical source of Omega 5) and Macadamia nuts contain Omega 7. I have been unable to find a good Vegan link about this that is not a "buy this" site. My diet lack Omega 5. I will be correcting this, as I do not react to pomegranate. Seabuckthorn if not done right, can cause body odor issues I've read. Personally, I prefer the macadamia nut, as I know what that is, and I know its Vegan. Pistachios contain Vitamin B6, Hazelnuts contain manganese.

In short though, eating a wide variety of vegetables, fruits and nuts normally results in a healthy diet. I would just pomegranate to this for the Omega 5, and Macademia nut for Omega 7. And, as long as you eat fortified sources of B12, generally, deficiencies don't happen in most people. Best Wishes!


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#17 Old 10-23-2016, 05:53 AM
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Thank you! I'm definitely doing research on where to get my nutrients and I am taking a vegan multivitamin/mineral, because I really don't eat much. I'm just one of those people who gets full easily. I'm taking all advice into consideration.

Oh, and thanks for the best wishes!


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#18 Old 10-26-2016, 01:24 PM
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education is key!

Hi Tues,
So glad to hear you want to be an ethical vegan, it will be the best decision you've ever made. Being an ethical vegan is easy if you do your research. Once you realize what animals endure to become food, you'll hopefully never want to contribute to animal agriculture again! I recommend watching some documentaries such as Cowspiracy, Earthlings, Forks Over Knives, and Vegucated. Another thing you can do is follow vegan pages on Facebook (if you have Facebook). These are some awesome YouTube videos that you should watch too (sorry I tried to link them but it won't let me).

101 Reasons to Go Vegan
Toward Rational, Authentic Food Choices | Melanie Joy Ted Talk

Being an ethical vegan means you are living your life as a protest against animal exploitation. If you don't believe in this wholeheartedly, it will be hard for you to commit to veganism, that is why educating yourself is so important! Best of luck.
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#19 Old 10-28-2016, 05:20 PM
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By the way, I finally found a website that admitted that the body does produce some Omega 7, but they are only really beginning to understand what amounts of Omega 7 we need, and how it benefits the body. Because Vegans are so healthy anyway, we are probably less likely to even need to supplement Omega 7s. However, I have been able to find anywhere that says we produce Omega 5 in our body.


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#20 Old 10-31-2016, 07:52 PM
Ethical Vegan in Training
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tpkyteroo luebeck View Post
By the way, I finally found a website that admitted that the body does produce some Omega 7, but they are only really beginning to understand what amounts of Omega 7 we need, and how it benefits the body. Because Vegans are so healthy anyway, we are probably less likely to even need to supplement Omega 7s. However, I have been able to find anywhere that says we produce Omega 5 in our body.


Thanks for the updated info! I appreciate it.
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#21 Old 11-05-2016, 09:52 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2016
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So happy to read this thread! It's filled with tons of useful tips and opinions, it makes my heart happy
I saved the PDF file and I was actually interested in those Facebook groups to follow, they usually are a quick source for recipes. I follow some blogs where I find most of the advises that helped me in these 2 months, I'll post them once I can ^^
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#22 Old 11-13-2016, 06:41 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2016
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My advice is don't beat yourself up! If you eat vegan most of the time, you are already doing a huge favor to the planet, to animals, and to your health. Life isn't black or white, all or nothing. It's all about the grey area in between those extremes. Good luck, and have fun!
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#23 Old 11-27-2016, 01:27 PM
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Location: PEI, Canada
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Hi Tues,

Such a good idea to ask advice and get support.

The one piece of good advice that I would give you (besides being willing to ask as many questions as you need to) is to make sure you supplement with B12. Someone else already mentioned it but I'm going to reiterate the suggestion.

I just read a PubMed article that said after looking at 18 studies, it was found that between 65% and 83% of vegans are B12 deficient. A deficiency can begin to affect your wellbeing within six years of quitting meat/not supplementing and the damage to your brain can be serious and ultimately lead to dementia like symptoms in your old age. So supplement your B12, if you don't want to find yourself being one of those sad ex-vegan stats. Other than that, enjoy the learning curve, it'll be over before you know it and you'll be cruising.
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