50 Reasons Not To Mow Your Lawn or Acreage - VeggieBoards

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#1 Old 11-14-2004, 09:22 PM
 
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http://www.egroups.com/messages/nomow108/55

Revised: Feb 25, 2004

Ron Howard, director of A Beautiful Mind and many other films,

made his first film at age 8.. an anti mowing film which

showed the nature of mowers' attacks on lawns.





Please download with 100% cotton, rice, recycled, or scrap paper.



In 2003, the world has seen floods, famine, fire,

mudslides, hurricanes, tornados and other disasters created by

the unprecedented destruction of trees around the world. Trees are

nature's weather stabilizers. We need trillions of trees.. new trees.



50 REASONS TO REDUCE OR ELIMINATE MOWING



ISAIAH: "BREAK NOT THE BRUISED REED"

THE FIFTH ANGEL OF REVELATION: " HARM NO

GREEN LIVING BEING"

BUDDHA: MAY ALL THAT HAVE LIFE BE DELIVERED

FROM SUFFERING

BHAGAVAD GITA: OF TREES I AM

THE

FIG

MAHAVIRA OF THE JAINS: KILL NOT CAUSE NO PAIN

TO ANY BEING







.GROW FREE FOOD .PREVENT MOWER ACCIDENTS .PROTECT SAPLING

TREES .CREATE OXYGEN .SAVE TIME . CONSERVE FUEL .SAVE

MONEY .GUARD FREEDOM .INVOKE RAIN. STABILIZE WEATHER

PATTERNS . STOP MUDSLIDES .BUFFER NOISE . DIVERT FLOODS .

FOSTER WILDLIFE HABITAT . FILTER AIR



http://www.epa.gov/greenacres http://www.nrdc.org



(not in the order of importance)

In the last few years the EPA has joined the

environmental groups promoting nonmowing. Their site is

http://www.epa.gov .. type in 'natural landscaping' in search to

bring up

many sites. The Green Party http://www.greens.org and many

Libertarians also support nonmowing. In June of 2002, NPR reported

that the Congressional Black Caucus has a better record than

either white Democrats or white Republicans in environmental issues.

(We know of 1 Congressional black Republican). 1 of every 5

killed by a mower is a child.



I: ENVIRONMENTAL (THE REDUCTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL

MANIPULATION)

1. REFORESTATION When one stops mowing, land becomes

meadow and then

thicket and then woods. reforesting the world.

2. OXYGEN CREATION This extra greenery creates oxygen.

The average

tree creates 5 pounds of oxygen daily.

3. AIR PURIFICATION And purifies the air through leaf

filtration a.

particulate matter b.car fumes c.noxious gases d.other

airborn toxins. Removal of carbon dioxide by plants

ameliorates

pollution.

4. TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION Warms the world's winters

and cools the summers. There is a 50 degree difference between 70

degree equatorial rainforest and 120 degree desert. Each blade of

grass

is a little air conditioner. A world without drought, flood,

famine, freezes, and killer heat can be eliminated by literally

covering

the world with trees.

5. RAIN INVOCATION

Greenery calls down rain. Bayard Webster of the NY

Times wrote that each mature tree evaporates 40 gallons of moisture

daily (much greater amounts for older trees.) All

greenery is involved in the raincycle.

The drought and consequent starvation in N. Korea was

related to the cutting of nearly all trees for fuel. (as is present

drought in the NW US). (NPR Sept 98 and other sources)

6. DEW PRESERVATION Preserves dew. Not only do green

spires and leaves act as masts around which dew can gather,

but the more greenery the longer the dew lasts.

7. NOISE BUFFER Weaves a noise buffer which screens

out unpleasant traffic

8. NOISE PREVENTION Ends the peace-fracturing sound of

the lawnmower. Some communities have noise ordinances which

prevent mowing during normal sleeping hours.

9. VISUAL BEAUTY Multiplies the beauty of diversity

10. FRAGRANCE Multiply the fragrance in the air.

11. HEALING GREEN Nonmowing creates optical healing by

creating more greenery. Research has proven that looking on the jade

and forest greens reduces heartbeat and creates peace.

12. LANDFILL ECONOMY Letting lawns grow wild reduces pressure on

landfills..by not adding leaves to overburdened

systems (and saves the fuel and wages of collection

releasing workers for the labor of their hearts). (NPR Sept 1:

methane

gases leach from landfill through water into basements) As the world

evolves away from treekilling, sawdust piles which are a byproduct

of the lumber industry will be removed, making the earth safer for

children.

13. FUEL CONSERVATION Conserves fuel a. unused in

unused mowers

b. As evergreen trees break cold winter winds and

shroud dwellings they are natural insulation.

14. HYDROCARBON REDUCTION Prevents hydrocarbon mower

emission from polluting the air. Many media outlets are passing on

the

EPA recommendation that lawns not be

mowed when there is great humidity and heat. Hydrocarbons create

ozone

alerts.

15. CARBON DIOXIDE Greenery which takes in carbon

dioxide and breathes out oxygen reduces gases toxic to humans.

15a. METHANE GAS and toxic gases are purified by leaf action.

16. TORNADO PREVENTION Unstable heat is the main

factor in tornados. Greenery which reduces the temperature 30 degrees

in forest areas prevents tornados.

17. MUDSLIDE PREVENTION: The roots of living plants

absorb great amounts of water and prevent mudslides.

18. FLOOD PREVENTION:

A. On river banks and everywhere, tree, plant, bush,

and vine roots are flood preventers. As David Kidd of Canton, planter

of

more than a million trees has stated, the bigger and older the tree

the

more work it does. (The 900 year old oaks with their huge diameters

are a lot more precious to Mother Earth than skinny young trees.

http://www.freetree.org

B. Ohio Public Radio David C. Barnett Sept 9th: reported on reduction

of impervious surface by reducing concrete and adding

greenery. (The hard asphalt, concrete, and rooftops create more

runoff and flooding.)

C. Bricks and stones in roads are better for the

environment than are concrete and asphalt. They allow rain through

the

inter-brick space and have less blistering heat. Angel strips not

devil

strips (Planting grape trellises over highways re-greens the

earth and creates food.)

19. PREVENT DESERTIFICATION Only reforestation can

prevent desertification. This is the conclusion of Patrick Velasquez

of US

Agency For International Development and most other

environmentalists. We used to think a pine cone was one seed, but

apparently it is hundreds.

20. REDUCE CHEMICAL POLLUTION: Radio network show

Public Interest October 7 featuring Rodale author: Chemically treated

lawns are grass high on drugs.: Fertilizer has toxic byproducts for

the land and water. Rodale, Emmaus Pennsylvania, USA 18049 is one

leader in the organic movement.

21. FASTEST CLEANUP OF TOXIC DUMPS

Green island sanctuaries of unmolested plants,

insects, and wildlife are a protection against the biotech

manipulations

of the environment.

22. WATERSHED PROTECTION

The more greenery, plants, vines, trees, and bushes..

the more the watershed, reservoirs, and lakes and ponds, brooks and

streams are protected.

a. Arsenic is a byproduct of the pressed wood

industry. Arsenic is poisonous in the waters, and like

other industrial pollutants such as mercury, chromium

and polychlorinated biphenols is concentrated in the flesh of fishes.

http://www.nofishing.net http://www.pcrm.org http://www.ivu.org

23. BIODIVERSITY

Nonmowing or letting God be the landscaper creates

biodiversity and its many benefits (and benefirs) rather than

monoculture. (Loggers last year caused the death of David Chain,

Earth First tree activist. Write efmc@a... or call 707 923 2114

Andy Caffrey)

24. FIRE PREVENTION

In March of 2001, widescale drought in the NW has been

reported. Destruction of greenery is one cause of this. Trees'

evaporation is necessary in cloud formation.

25. FLOOD PREVENTION Nonmowing causes natural

reforestation. Tree roots on river banks prevent floods.

26. WATER CONSERVATION: Unmowed areas do not need

watering.. they are self contained systems. Nor do they need

recycling.

27. INSECTICIDE PREVENTION: Carpet lawn enthusiasts

pollute

the environment with insecticides in some cases.



II HUMAN RIGHTS: (Numbers 19 through 31)

1. FEEDING THE HUNGRY: FOOD CREATION Prevents famine

by giving a cornucopia of free food to the planet Orchards are 450

times as productive per acre as slaughterhouses..Dr. Faust,

former chief of the USDA Fruit Labs, cited centenarian orchards of

apple trees dropping two tons each of food. This is 400,000 lbs per

acre

as compared to 100 to 1000 lbs of food for meat, 10,000 lbs for

dairy, 80,000 lbs. for acre. The 400 to l ratio is only the first

step. Tri

level agriculture.. with bean and other vines around the

tree trunks and other foodyielding plants in the interarboreal

spaces.. yield even more. This also can be multiplied by those areas

which have 2 or 3 growing seasons..e.g. Southern California. Because

certain economic systems promote scarcity based profit, these orchard

systems have been deemphasized.

2. PREVENTION OF DEATH AND INJURY Prevents in the U.S.

alone, 75,000 accidents and some fatalities annually caused by

mowers and harvesters, and around the world millions of accidents

eliminated. NPR reported May 17, 2002 that tractor rollovers are

the leading cause of death among farmers, and that farming in

general is the 2nd most hazardous occupation (after commercial

fishing).

2b. Ravines are generally more protected from mowing,

as there is wider recognition of the danger of mowing.

2c. When grass is mowed on hillsides, when wet or

exceedingly dry it can cause slipping accidents.

3. PREVENTION OF HEART ATTACKS As non shoveling of

snow can prevent winter heart attacks nonmowing can sometimes

prevent

summer heart attacks.

4. FREEDOM Health departments are reducing the forced

crewcutting of lawns and the rending of

Mother Nature's garments . See below for further info.

5. EMPTY JAILS Saves money otherwise spent on jailing people (see

above)
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#2 Old 11-15-2004, 12:23 AM
 
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Interesting post.
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#3 Old 11-16-2004, 10:47 PM
 
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I better not show this to my husband....he'll never mow our patch of grass again!!
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#4 Old 11-17-2004, 12:01 AM
 
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I only made it to point #1. I don't want my little yard turning into a meadow or a forest.
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#5 Old 11-17-2004, 12:49 AM
 
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I doubt I'd ever mow my lawn - unless I had one of those nonelectric push mowers with the rotating blades - those are really awesome. I wonder if they still make them.



In any case, my favorite lawns are those under pine trees. The ground is still soft with needles, and short, so no mowing is necessary.
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#6 Old 11-17-2004, 01:28 AM
 
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aside from rabbits, the best lawnmower I saw is a solar powered one. Too expensive for us, but really good. Swedish manufacturer. You lay a wire on the grass where you want it to stop cutting, and leave it to walk around on it's own. It's quiet and small and it glides around the lawn looking for blades of grass to chop with blades like sissors. When it gets to the wire it turns away from it and randomly goes somewhere else.

Our lawns vary between 6" high grass to 24" high and there's no chance of cutting them before next spring, we got a bit behind this year!
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#7 Old 11-17-2004, 06:00 AM
 
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Well, as a homeowner I have to say that not mowing is *not* an option for most of us with a lawn. That would be unneighborly, would drive down property values, would be unsightly, and would probably cause a neighborhood uprising. And I suspect 99% of those of you in apartments and condos are paying to have the grassy areas cut, so not mowing isn't much of an option for most of you either, I would assume.



That being said, there are ways to help *reduce* the amount of land that needs to be mowed. For example, you can plant ground covers in strategic areas of your lawn. I am looking into doing just that in my back yard.



Thanks for sharing the article.
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#8 Old 11-17-2004, 06:26 AM
 
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I've covered my front garden with stones, rocks and flints, then planted shrubs. No more mowing! Hopefully, no more weeding either, once the shrubs merge with each other. And it's a bright cheerful colour in the winter compared to grass green.
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#9 Old 11-17-2004, 10:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikie View Post

I doubt I'd ever mow my lawn - unless I had one of those nonelectric push mowers with the rotating blades - those are really awesome. I wonder if they still make them.



They still make them. I have one- although the new one broke so I'm using an older nonmotorized mower which I got for a song at a garage sale.



They just need an occasional sharpening, depending on how much mowing you do. I haven't carefully compared my lawn to other people's, but I seem to have more grasshoppers and crickets than those who use power mowers. Which is OK with me... they don't seem to go after my vegetables. (The earwigs like to use my romaine lettuce as condos, though...)



One thing about not mowing... I've tried that with individual small patches. When it isn't mowed, weeds tend to start taking over. I wouldn't have expected this, but it's true, evidently... grass can often take being mowed more easily than other plants can.

Peasant (1963-1972) and Fluffy (1970s?-1982- I think of you as 'Ambrose' now)- Your spirits outshone some humans I have known. Be happy forever.
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#10 Old 11-17-2004, 02:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

I only made it to point #1. I don't want my little yard turning into a meadow or a forest.



What are you talking about?? I tihnk it would be amazing to see my lawn take that transformation (thought it would probably take a little longer than I ahve to live). That would be just great if my lawn was a forest.
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#11 Old 11-17-2004, 04:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikie View Post

I doubt I'd ever mow my lawn - unless I had one of those nonelectric push mowers with the rotating blades - those are really awesome. I wonder if they still make them.



i bought mine at lowe's.



where i live, if you don't mow, the city writes you a ticket.



in some rural and even suburban areas, there are businesses who rent herds of goats out to people to eat their grass so they don't have to mow.
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#12 Old 11-17-2004, 08:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikie View Post

I doubt I'd ever mow my lawn - unless I had one of those nonelectric push mowers with the rotating blades - those are really awesome. I wonder if they still make them.



In any case, my favorite lawns are those under pine trees. The ground is still soft with needles, and short, so no mowing is necessary.



We have one of those....bought it at Sears. My husband hates it so much. We have St. Augustine grass, and it's very hearty with super thick blades.....so it's very hard to cut. It's the best grass because it chokes out weeds, needs very little water, and stays very green year round.
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#13 Old 11-17-2004, 09:02 PM
 
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you actually get "cited" by the city where i live if you don't mow your grass regularly. and if you still refuse to cut your lawn, you can face heavy fines.



i prefer the wild look over super-groomed lawns and gardens, personally.
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#14 Old 11-17-2004, 10:18 PM
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I mowed renegade lawns for a living one summer... vacant houses don't cut their grass too often. It wasn't much fun.

Q: How many poets does it take to change a light bulb? A: 1001...one to change the bulb, 1000 to say it's already been done.
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#15 Old 11-18-2004, 10:44 AM
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I thought it was a bit heavy-handed to tell people they had to mow their lawn. But in my town, I tried to get a variance for a patch (because I like long grass too), and the Health Department has a say in these lawn-mowing ordinances. So it's not just a matter of appearance; it's a public sanitation issue.

Peasant (1963-1972) and Fluffy (1970s?-1982- I think of you as 'Ambrose' now)- Your spirits outshone some humans I have known. Be happy forever.
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#16 Old 11-18-2004, 11:10 AM
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Why does long grass affect sanitation? I know you can hide more stuff in long grass than in short, but how much does that happen?

Q: How many poets does it take to change a light bulb? A: 1001...one to change the bulb, 1000 to say it's already been done.
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#17 Old 11-21-2004, 10:50 AM
 
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I read this book recently that was awesomely empowering.





"The Landscaping Revolution







Andy Wasowski with Sally Wasowski.

Contemporary Books,

Lincolnwood, Illinois, 2000.

176 pages. 8" x 101/2".





"Revolution" might seem rather a strong term for landscaping practices that place wildlife benefits and resource conservation on at least equal footing with aesthetics and tradition. And yet the revolution is afoot. It is native plants and biodiversity versus the tyranny of turf. Vive la Revolution!



Most Americans believe that the lawn has always been the central element in the landscape. In fact, the lawn has only been a fixture for commoners since the 1930s, albeit a well-entrenched fixture worth $27 billion annually in products and services.



For many eager horticultural revolutionaries, 1994 was a turning point in the intellectual battle for the American landscape, with naturalists, water conservation planners, and others cheering the arrival of Virginia Scott Jenkins' The Lawn: A History of an American Obsession (Smithsonian Institution Press), which provided a scholarly and compelling critique and history of landscaping myopia and environmental abuse. Now, Andy and Sally Wasowski have produced a conversational-and sometimes comic-study on the forces of change in American landscaping. From the author of Requiem for a Lawnmower, we have a delightful and lighthearted romp beyond the sea of grass and into the heart of the native plant and xeriscaping movements.



Is it any wonder? With dwindling groundwater reserves in the American heartland, cyclical droughts, and mandatory watering restrictions on the one hand, and Code Red Smog Alerts restricting the use of lawnmowers and backpack leafblowers on the other, our revered lawns are falling somewhat out of favor. In addition, we find the biodiversity of spaceship Earth shrinking with each day as habitat is cleared, developed, and paved over.



Part of the solution rests in America's yards and gardens through the use of a full range of natural landscaping practices. The authors tackle issues such as exotic invasive plants, homogenized landscapes, and peer pressure in a tone both jaunty and familiar. They recognize that even important changes in behavior take time, and that most people have inherited a bulldozed landscape that cannot be undone overnight.



The Landscaping Revolution provides graduated steps, or "scenarios," that guide and inspire remedial efforts to restore natural vitality and balance to the most white-bread of landscapes. Moreover, the book is filled with case studies of revolution: truly heartening sidebar profiles of adventurous gardeners who have successfully lobbied and fought against the turf-only paradigm in numerous North American municipalities.



Like most true revolutions, the conflict for proper land use and self-determination is political as well as philosophical. Decades-old ordinances and weed laws, right-of-way maintenance policies, and strict community covenants are just a sample of the social and political challenges the revolution must overcome. Happily, the Wasowskis' wry approach is empowering and entertaining and the tales of successful "landscape revolutionaries" interwoven throughout the book offer many choices for very personal landscaping revolutions that can and must be undertaken by all gardeners of conscience.



- Joseph M. Keyser







Last edited: 10/13/2004 "



http://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/de...revolution.asp
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#18 Old 11-21-2004, 11:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skylark View Post

Why does long grass affect sanitation? I know you can hide more stuff in long grass than in short, but how much does that happen?



It is not really so much that you can hide more stuff in it, as what hides in it. Fleas, mosquitos, other wildlife (most of which is completely benign but people are afraid of, like snakes) tend to thrive in taller grass and weeds. We have been cited several times for not mowing our lawn soon enough and it is usually about mosquitos. I think that is bull becuase the real problem there is standing water, not tall grass.
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#19 Old 11-21-2004, 11:21 AM
 
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What does "cited " involve? I've never heard of anyone in the UK being done for long grass, and occasionally back gardens are such a junk yard of old rubbish you'd be afraid to go near them before the local authority intervenes.
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#20 Old 10-06-2005, 09:05 AM
 
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I know this is an old thread, but I just had to post some information and links. (Do I start a new thread on an old topic, or do I dig up an old thread.. the rock and the hard place!)



On this subject, I urge everyone in America to read Noah's Garden by Sara Stein. It may also be applicable to people living in other countries as well, but it was written toward an American audience concerning the problems of the American style lawn. On top of being an important issue that most people are completely unaware of, it's simply a good book.



I also recommend:

Planting Noah's Garden by Sara Stein

The Wildlife Garden by Charlotte Seidenberg

Redesigning the American Lawn by F. Herbert Bormann, Diana Balmori & Gordon T. Geballe

The Wild Lawn Handbook by Stevie Daniels

Field and Forest by Jane Scott

Going Native by The Brooklyn Botanic Garden



Also, here are some links to organization promting natural landscaping. I've linked mainly to ones relevant to my state, but your state probably has similar programs and organizations.

http://www.for-wild.org/

http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/wildscapes/

http://www.npsot.org/Austin/default.htm
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#21 Old 10-11-2005, 04:12 AM
 
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I'm happy to see this thread revived! I don't really understand the whole lawn thing, why people think they are so important.



You can have a beautiful yard without a lawn and without letting your yard become a weedpatch.





There are beautiful pictures of a lawn-free yard here:



http://pathtofreedom.com/photogaller...004/index.html
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#22 Old 10-11-2005, 07:26 AM
 
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I only need one--it's boring.



I've got better things to do.



I tell all of my friends that if the day ever comes when I actually give a crap about what kind of lawn mower I buy, what length to cut the grass, what fertilizer/herbicide/etc. to use, whether I've got clover or dandelions in my lawn, etc. to please shoot me in the head.



I'm certain that when the day comes that I care about that stuff, I will have nothing important to live for.
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#23 Old 10-11-2005, 08:07 AM
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I can think of a couple thousand reasons why I have to mow my yard. All of the dollars. Our home owners' association really insists that lawns be mowed. 14 days after the first notice if the lawn isn't mowed you are fined $150.00 dollars. Every notice after than for non-compliance is another $150.00. Until they take you to court. Then, when you loose and you will loose, you have to pay not only the assessed fees and court costs and attorney's fees you still have to mow your lawn.



I think I'll keep mowing.

I am the user formerly known as MrsKey
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#24 Old 10-11-2005, 09:02 AM
 
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I'm glad to see this thread! We have 6 acres of land....mowing it takes hours...and I would love to turn it into a wildflower field. I've looked into it....the preparation looks like serious work, but it would be so pretty and so nice not to have to mow. We live in a farmette development where there are no regulations about mowing, so we could do it. I think it would be fantastic.....just have a few paths winding around the wildflowers, maybe a place for a bench to sit and read, all kinds of little woodland critters living there.......
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#25 Old 10-11-2005, 11:35 AM
 
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Here are a couple of excellent sites on the subject of weeds, since most consider them "pests".



Controlling weeds and pests

"Most of the plants that I call weeds are involved in the primary stages of natural succession," writes Kim Wilkinson in AgroForester. "They are medicine for the soil, repairing it and revitalizing life. Succeeding weeds is about stepping-up the process of succession. Weeds are experts in the process of succession, and great soil indicators as well, so I always look to them to learn what is appropriate. This means mulching and filling the space with appropriate plants (groundcovers, crop trees and other vegetation), creating a healthy system with no room and no need for voracious weeds to modify it. Some of the most aggressive weeds need full sun and low fertility to thrive; by increasing shade, organic matter and soil health they will disappear."





Weeds: Guardians of the Soil

Publisher's Preface



SO FAR as we are able to determine this is the first book to be written in praise of weeds. Many are the books which treat weeds as pests, and each season sees an advance in anti-weed campaigns and techniques; a host of chemicals, mechanical eradicators and even flame throwers are making life increasingly hard for nature's greatest and most widely dispersed group of plants -- the plants which stand condemned because they are deemed "out-of-place."



That the ordinary garden and roadside weed might have a vital function in the scheme of things and be of inestimable value to mankind seems not to have occurred to most agriculturists, whether in the classroom, the departments of agriculture or on the farm.



The author of this book has been teaching conservation and biology for close to fifty years. But he has been a student as well and a keen field man who has specialized in the ways of weeds, not only in his home state of Oklahoma where he has spent much time learning from the Indians, but in other parts of the world -- in Europe, India and the Philippines, particularly.



According to Joseph Cocannouer, weeds -- the common ragweeds, pigweeds, pusleys and nettles, to mention four -- perform the following valuable services among others:



1. They bring minerals, especially those which have been depleted, up from the subsoil to the topsoil and make them available to crops. This is particularly important with regard to trace elements.



2.When used in crop rotation they break up hardpans and allow subsequent crop roots to feed deeply.



3. They fiberize and condition the soil and provide a good environment for the minute but important animal and plantlife that make any soil productive.



4. They are good indicators of soil condition, both as to variety of weed present and to condition of the individual plant. Certain weeds appear when certain deficiencies occur.



5. Weeds are deep divers and feeders and through soil capillarity they enable the less hardy, surface feeding crops to withstand drought better than the crop alone could.



6. As companion crops they enable our domesticated plants to get their roots to otherwise unavailable food.



7. Weeds store up minerals and nutrients that would be washed, blown or leached away from bare ground and keep them readily available.



8. Weeds make good eating -- for man as well as for livestock. The publisher can vouch for the superiority of lamb's quarter -- a favorite of the author -- over any other domestic form of spinach or cooked greens.



No, Professor Cocannouer does not believe that weeds should be allowed to go rampant and take over our farms and gardens. The function of this book, a pioneering work, is to demonstrate how the controlled use of weeds can be sound ccology, good conservation and a boon to the average farmer or gardener.

D. A. G.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Once we live in a home, it won't be anywhere near a home-association (don't believe in that kind of control over my property - city ordinances are plenty of regulation) and I will either get a non-powered push mower or I will likely rip out the lawn entirely and put in a native ground cover - xeriscaping
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#26 Old 10-11-2005, 03:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrsKey View Post

I can think of a couple thousand reasons why I have to mow my yard. All of the dollars. Our home owners' association really insists that lawns be mowed. 14 days after the first notice if the lawn isn't mowed you are fined $150.00 dollars. Every notice after than for non-compliance is another $150.00. Until they take you to court. Then, when you loose and you will loose, you have to pay not only the assessed fees and court costs and attorney's fees you still have to mow your lawn.



I think I'll keep mowing.



MrsKey, I was going to put this in my original post... when I was still a law student, I represented a guy who was slowly converting his lawn to a natural landscape and having trouble with the locals, and I did a fair amount of research on weed ordinances, I think most of the homeowners rules are similar. They mostly specify that grass and uncultivated vegetation must be kept under a certain number of inches, but they can be frequently gotten around by showing that the vegetation in question is cultivated or is not grass. In other words, yes, you have to mow your grass, but there's nothing that says you have to have grass. They're generally designed to keep homeowners from simply abandoning their lawns and creating health hazards. We had pretty good luck getting the city off his back by showing the inspector that he was taking care of his vegetation, and there were no health hazards. I did have to get the guy to agree to keep the remaining grass mowed, but his plan was to gradually increase the beds where he was growing native understory plants and reduce the areas of grass over time until there was none left. We were actually considering challenging the ordinance on First Amendment grounds if we had to, but fortunately it didn't come to that. Yeah, we probably would have lost, but damn! I'd like to see that go to the Supreme Court. But First Amendment issues wouldn't help you with a homeowners' association, since they're private.



Also, here's a link to the Wild Ones section on weed laws:

http://www.for-wild.org/weedlaws/weedlaw.html
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#27 Old 10-11-2005, 04:03 PM
 
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Join Date: Aug 2002
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But if one doesn't mow their lawn how will one show off one's assortment of pink flamingos and Tweety bird and Sylvester wind-mill ornaments?





If I had a house it would be let go wild with Japanese zen rock gardens amonst all that. Hmmm then I'd be out raking my stones into perfect patterns ...one just can't win LOL



I've often wondered why people get so irate about these easily growing yellow flowers called dandilions and they spend so much effort getting rid of them and then spend just as much effort trying to get other yellow flowers to grow which apparently don't last long.



Thanks for the links.
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#28 Old 10-11-2005, 11:02 PM
 
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Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 4,579
My parent's front yard is mostly shade, it doesn't grow too much grass or much of anything on its own. There are a few weeds in a corner that grow only inches high but that's about it.



They always mow my apartment areas while I'm trying to sleep. The mowers they use are extremely loud.



dk_art, my favorite thing in the world when I was a child was a patch of grass with dandlions. Can you tell I grew up in the city?
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#29 Old 10-11-2005, 11:52 PM
 
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Join Date: Mar 2005
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludi View Post

I'm happy to see this thread revived! I don't really understand the whole lawn thing, why people think they are so important.



You can have a beautiful yard without a lawn and without letting your yard become a weedpatch.





There are beautiful pictures of a lawn-free yard here:



http://pathtofreedom.com/photogaller...004/index.html





That's so pretty!
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#30 Old 10-12-2005, 08:14 AM
 
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 10,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludi View Post

I'm happy to see this thread revived! I don't really understand the whole lawn thing, why people think they are so important.



You can have a beautiful yard without a lawn and without letting your yard become a weedpatch.





There are beautiful pictures of a lawn-free yard here:



http://pathtofreedom.com/photogaller...004/index.html





Burglars must love that place.
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