Revlon--TESTS ON ANIMALS - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 06-27-2012, 03:47 PM
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I was doing some research to find a hair dye manufacturer that doesn't test on animals.  I was surprised to see how many people think Revlon doesn't.  Revlon DOES TEST ON ANIMALS.  Check PETA.org.

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#2 Old 06-27-2012, 03:59 PM
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I just saw something about this earlier, too. Completely sucks. Let me find the link.

Edit: This was it https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=4181

It's about how Revlon was able to sell in China without testing cosmetics on non-human animals or they've covering up that they are testing in order to sell.

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#3 Old 06-27-2012, 05:36 PM
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They just lost my business.
 

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#4 Old 06-27-2012, 06:14 PM
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Yeah, some companies can be deceiving brood.gif

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#5 Old 06-28-2012, 07:33 AM
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I found this out a little while ago as well. Sigh.

 

It's so tricky finding ones that don't. On the back of all sanctuary products it says 'against animal testing' so I got a ton of their stuff as a gift by my (omni) family being supportive, but I checked PETA, nature watch and BUAV and all of them say that sanctuary DO test on animals. furious.gif

 

Not sure how they get away with what appears to be blatant false advertising, it's ridiculous!

 

The only well known (and reasonably priced) UK cosmetic brands I trust at the moment are LUSH, Barry-M and Superdrug own brand.


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I love animals. So I don't eat them either
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#6 Old 06-28-2012, 07:39 AM
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I'm not sure where PETA gets its information. I've noticed multiple companies that state on their websites that they do *not* do animal testing are listed as doing animal testing by PETA. Although I can't find anything on the Revlon website, I am skeptical of info coming from PETA.
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#7 Old 06-28-2012, 07:44 AM
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Petas website said that revlon doesnt test on animals the last time that i checked
So what hair dye am i supposed to use now ive been using revlon forever because i thought they were ok.
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#8 Old 06-28-2012, 07:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RunnerVeggie View Post

I'm not sure where PETA gets its information. I've noticed multiple companies that state on their websites that they do *not* do animal testing are listed as doing animal testing by PETA. Although I can't find anything on the Revlon website, I am skeptical of info coming from PETA.


They're not BUAV approved either, Revlon that is, and BUAV accepts companies who's parent does test on animals even if they don't (such as body shop).

 

I can't check my nature watch booklet as I don't have it on me, but I'm pretty sure they are on the bad people list in there as well.

 

I've heard a lot of people say that PeTA can give incorrect info, so I always check more than once source. Companies are so sneaky as well, they can put 'we do not test on animals' and have other companies do it on their behalves, and technically not be lying. I tend to ignore the packaging and misleading website information and check BUAV etc.


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I love animals. So I don't eat them either
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#9 Old 06-28-2012, 08:15 AM
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They're not BUAV approved either, Revlon that is, and BUAV accepts companies who's parent does test on animals even if they don't (such as body shop).

I can't check my nature watch booklet as I don't have it on me, but I'm pretty sure they are on the bad people list in there as well.

I've heard a lot of people say that PeTA can give incorrect info, so I always check more than once source. Companies are so sneaky as well, they can put 'we do not test on animals' and have other companies do it on their behalves, and technically not be lying. I tend to ignore the packaging and misleading website information and check BUAV etc.

What is BUAV? I am also wary of all these extra certifications as they usually just mean the company spent extra money to be advertised in a booklet. You can see how small "organic" companies might be more inclined to do so than large companies that are already successful.

It looks like what has happened is that PETA suspects Revlon of doing some animal testing in China. Otherwise they have been not been participating in animal testing for many years, if you scroll back in this: PETA blog on Revlon.
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#10 Old 06-28-2012, 08:45 AM
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What is BUAV? I am also wary of all these extra certifications as they usually just mean the company spent extra money to be advertised in a booklet. You can see how small "organic" companies might be more inclined to do so than large companies that are already successful.
It looks like what has happened is that PETA suspects Revlon of doing some animal testing in China. Otherwise they have been not been participating in animal testing for many years, if you scroll back in this: PETA blog on Revlon.

Hi RunnerVeggie

 

Take a look at what BUAV are about, in my opinion they are fantastic:  http://www.buav.org/

 

In the UK, brands that are approved by them get a leaping bunny logo to assure buyers their products and ingredients in the products are not tested on animals.

 

I hear what you‚Äôre saying, and you might be correct, I don‚Äôt really know to be honest. But the best I think I can do is trust a company whose sole aim is supposed to be ‚Äėcampaigning peacefully to create a world where nobody wants or believes we need to experiment on animals‚Äô rather than cosmetic companies who are known to use clever marketing ploys and deceitful wording in order to sell their products.

 

Sorry, I can’t find the correct section from that link regarding Revlon, I will have a look into it and see what I can find.


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#11 Old 06-28-2012, 08:46 AM
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This is BUAV's latest list: http://www.buav.org/_lib/userfiles/files/Guides/BUAVA_LittleBook_OnlineVersion_Feb2011.pdf


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I love animals. So I don't eat them either
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#12 Old 06-28-2012, 09:03 AM
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Sorry, I can’t find the correct section from that link regarding Revlon, I will have a look into it and see what I can find.

The entire page is their blog posts about Revlon. But, in particular this post states:
Quote:
In 1993, PETA persuaded General Motors to become the first company to stop using animals in automobile crash tests, and other companies soon followed until those horrendous experiments were eradicated. At PETA's urging, Revlon and Estée Lauder became the first mainstream corporations to end animal testing, and since then more than 950 household, cosmetics, and personal-care companies have followed suit.

Now, on 6/16/2012, they are saying:
Quote:
Tell Revlon to come clean about whether it's paying for animal tests in order to market its cosmetics in China, and encourage the company always to be cruelty-free.

It sounds like in order to sell in China, they might be required to do some animal testing. Although, PETA doesn't seem like they're too sure about it. Rather than saying anything outright, they are asking Revlon to "come clean." PETA certainly can use some clever and potentially deceptive wording too at time.
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#13 Old 06-28-2012, 10:46 AM
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I hate how we cannot trust anything in our society... 


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#14 Old 06-28-2012, 11:02 AM
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I was under the impression that Revlon halted animal testing about 20 years ago, thanks to the campaigning of the late Henry Spira, rather than PETA. PETA was actually only marginally involved. When PETA takes the credit for this, they're stepping on other activists' toes.


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#15 Old 06-29-2012, 02:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RunnerVeggie View Post


The entire page is their blog posts about Revlon. But, in particular this post states:
Quote:
In 1993, PETA persuaded General Motors to become the first company to stop using animals in automobile crash tests, and other companies soon followed until those horrendous experiments were eradicated. At PETA's urging, Revlon and Estée Lauder became the first mainstream corporations to end animal testing, and since then more than 950 household, cosmetics, and personal-care companies have followed suit.
Now, on 6/16/2012, they are saying:
Quote:
Tell Revlon to come clean about whether it's paying for animal tests in order to market its cosmetics in China, and encourage the company always to be cruelty-free.
It sounds like in order to sell in China, they might be required to do some animal testing. Although, PETA doesn't seem like they're too sure about it. Rather than saying anything outright, they are asking Revlon to "come clean." PETA certainly can use some clever and potentially deceptive wording too at time.

 

For some reason the link doesn’t take me to the page, it says at the top www.blahblahblah/archive/revlon/ etc. then the page loads for a while and the Revlon bit goes way and it takes me to the home page. No idea why, thanks for posting the info though.

 

I really hope so RunnerVeggie, but I heard that although they don't test their finished products on animals or do any animal testing themselves, they do use/buy ingredients that go into their products that are tested on animals, so still contribute to animal testing in some way.  

 

I can’t seem to find a definitive answer on Revlon so haven’t used them just in case.


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I love animals. So I don't eat them either
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#16 Old 12-25-2012, 06:33 AM
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Some companies state that they don't test on animals, however they may be using ingredients that are. In which case this could be the reason why they appear on the PETA list.

 

As for hair dye's - NATURTINT - I can't praise this product highly enough, I love it. 

 

  • Naturtint Permanent Hair Colorant with Vegetable Ingredients
  • 30 colours can be mixed easily & economically to create an infinite range.
  • No ammonia, parabens or resorcinol - dermatologically tested.
  • Covers 100% grey and can lighten up to 2 shades at a time.
  • Enriched with Soya, Corn, Coconut and Wheat Extracts.
  • Selected natural & organically approved & certified ingredients
  • Adds wonderful shine and vitality to the hair

 

Here are the links to the product:

 

USA - http://www.naturtintusa.com/

 

UK (permanent) - http://www.naturesdream.co.uk/naturtint/colour_guide.php

 

UK (semi permanent) - http://www.naturesdream.co.uk/naturtint/reflex.php

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#17 Old 12-27-2012, 05:03 PM
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Hi, I thought I might be able to add something to this.

 

When in doubt, I email people to see what their response is. It's not always a sure fire way to do it, but I figure if I've got it in writing that they DON'T test from them, then if ever I find out they're lying....Well, if a court case needed to be mounted then I could help. I know, silly.

 

But on to the things that are important-

This was a reply from Revlon that I got in April this year. (My question was along the lines of whether any Revlon products, or base ingredients used in the products, were tested by Revlon or a third party paid for, by Revlon)


Thank you for your email to Revlon regarding animal testing.

Revlon has not used animal testing for many years, in fact we released a press release in June of 1989 to this effect and Revlon continues to comply with all government laws and regulations necessary to ensure the safety of its Revlon and Almay products.

We can assure you that Revlon has continued with its promise to eliminate animal testing in all phases of research, development and manufacturing of all its products.    Revlon relies on the judgment of pharmacological, toxicological and medical experts, non-animal alternative test methods and the past safety history of formulations and ingredients to determine product safety.  Revlon does not contract out animal studies to independent laboratories.

We trust the above will serve to answer your enquiry.


After the controversy that PETA created, I emailed them again. Same question.

This is the reply as of September this year-

 

Thank you for your email.

 

Revlon does not conduct animal testing. Since 1989, Revlon has eliminated animal testing in all phases of research, development and manufacturing of all of our products. We do not support, nor request that our suppliers do, animal testing.  In fact, our vendor standards state that Revlon does not condone the use of animal testing in any of its products and instructs suppliers that they should not perform any animal testing for product development and/or safety evaluations on materials or products supplied to Revlon.

 

Thanks and regards,

 



_____

 

I didn't like the part about 'recommending' vendors to not test, when the word was that they were about to sell in the Chinese market (meaning their products would be tested anyway). So, I've stopped buying from them. If they want to officially state that they do not support testing of cosmetics on animals and will not allow their products to be tested, then I might buy their products again. But their answer, so far, is too wishy washy for me.

There are plenty of other brands out there to try, who are just as good.







 

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#18 Old 03-06-2014, 10:12 AM
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I was searching for another thread and after I came across I briefly scrolled through the comments. To begin with---while PETA is a large and well-known animal rights organization, it is not the only organization. And when the subject is product testing there is only one that is truly trustworthy -

 

    LEAPING BUNNY

 

 

 

As Heather Louise pointed out previously, the BUAV (British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection) is fantastic and is the founder of the Leaping Bunny campaign. http://www.gocrueltyfree.org/


There is also the Leaping Bunny for North America -- http://leapingbunny.org/ -- a division of Leaping Bunny that is headed by the CCIC (Coalition for Consumer Information on Cosmetics), which is made up of eight national animal protection groups. The Leaping Bunny works in partnership on both sides of the Atlantic and is the only international animal-test-free product listing.

Each site has its own advantages, such as on the International site you can refine your search to companies that are vegetarian or vegan or that sell online. While the North American site offers links for the Leaping Bunny app, so you can have the updated list of certified companies and products right on your mobile device while shopping!   
:up:

 

On the subject of other cruelty-free lists, please keep in mind that regardless of the size or status of a company or organization, the words "cruelty free" or "not tested on animals" do not necessarily mean what you think.

To be more specific...

 

Quote:

Many companies label their products as 'not tested on animals' or 'against animal testing' but do not adhere to the Humane Standards. Why would they say this if it wasn't true?

 

The Humane Cosmetics Standard and the Humane Household Products Standard were formed precisely to provide a guarantee for consumers in light of the growing range of animal testing claims made by companies. Unfortunately, some companies, recognising the importance of this issue to consumers, take liberties with the language on their packaging. This can be confusing.

 

Deceptive ‚Äėnot tested on animals‚Äô claims may be truthful in the literal sense, although may well hide the fact that the ingredients in the product have been animal tested.

 

A company itself may not test; it may not even commission testing on its behalf. However, testing may occur by its ingredient suppliers, and a company may purchase ingredients with a ‚Äėdon't ask, don't tell‚Äô philosophy.
http://www.gocrueltyfree.org/consumer/faqs


Many organizations just accept the word of the company that animals were not tested upon and call it good. And while companies such as Revlon, Avon, and others have been listed as "cruelty free" by other organizations, they have NEVER been certified by Leaping Bunny. Because Leaping Bunny investigates everything! Not just the finished product (which is rarely used for tests), but the ingredient manufacturers as well. AND they insist on recertification by each and every company every year.
 

Quote:

What's the difference between the Humane Standards and other 'cruelty-free' lists I have seen?

 

A number of retailers and animal groups promote their own ‚Äėcruelty-free‚Äô schemes. However, the companies approved by them have often done no more than issue a convincing ‚ÄĒ sometimes misleading ‚ÄĒ policy statement on animal testing.

 

The Leaping Bunny certification is unrivalled, as it requires each company to open its processes to independent audit throughout its supply chain, to ensure that it adheres to its animal testing policy and the Standards’ strict criteria.

http://www.gocrueltyfree.org/consumer/faqs

 


Also, Leaping Bunny knew that even when certain companies were not testing on animals (or using ingredients that were tested on animals) in the United States, they were selling their products in China, which meant they HAD to use animals to test upon due to the country's policies. Mary Kay is one company that was certified by Leaping Bunny, but the moment the company started marketing their wares out of China Leaping Bunny dropped them!


I am the Outreach Director for SAEN (Stop Animal Exploitation NOW!) and was hired specifically because of my dedication toward the investigation and elimination of the use of animals in product testing. SAEN is proud to represent Leaping Bunny and I hope after learning these facts you will do so as well. Thank you.
 

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