Are the ASPCA and the humane society ok? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 01-15-2004, 09:45 PM
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I seem to remember that there were some issues with one or both, but now I can't remember or find anything about it.
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#2 Old 01-15-2004, 10:21 PM
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the aspca is local only to new york, while the spca is a nationwide organization, i do believe



i prefer no kill shelters, but spcas are sometimes kill shelters

still they do the best they can



i do recall something being off about the humane society, i cant quite put my finger on it though
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#3 Old 01-15-2004, 11:20 PM
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Both are wonderful organizations. The only bad thing is their finances. Because both of them are open-access shelters they deal with a lot of bad publicity over the fact that they have to put animals to sleep (there simply aren't enough homes and not enough people are stepping up to help), so they spend a tremendous deal of money trying to raise finances in spite of their negative perception for euthanizing animals, and so unfortunately the majority of the money you donate to them goes back into fundraising and admin costs instead of directly helping the animals. Generally the Humane Society gets bad ratings from Charity Watch groups because of this, however they have made progress and are doing better and their ratings have gone up from 1 star to 2 stars (out of 4) in most watch groups. However they still get bad ratings for finance efficiency. Another fault IMO is that high-level employees are paid excessive salaries. The CEO did take a large pay cut, but he still earns nearly $300,000 a year! For someone working in a non-profit sector I find that unacceptable. Anyways, here is Charity Navigator's summary page for the Humane Society USA: http://www.charitynavigator.org/inde...orgid/3848.htm and here is the Better Business Bureau summary for the Humane Soceity: http://www.give.org/reports/care_dyn.asp?226
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#4 Old 01-16-2004, 02:25 AM
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Thanks for the info, kpick!



About the CEO wage: maybe with their size and challenges, they have to afford a CEO of this price category. Good people are hard to come by and they have their price. Perhaps it's still a better deal than having a volunteer CEO that does a bad job.
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#5 Old 01-16-2004, 11:18 AM
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300,000 is a bit excessive, even if this is a great CEO, dont you think?



a person heading a nonprofit organization should realize how much further their agency could go if they were only taking 80,000 rather than 300,000 from the cut
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#6 Old 01-16-2004, 11:52 AM
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Wow, if a CEO of a non-profit can make 300,000, I wonder what the CEO of a profit driven company makes???

*Starts looking into what it takes to be a CEO*

hehe



Although, I think that is a bit too much, you'd think a person could live just fine on like 100,000 a year? I only make half that and I'm pretty comfy.



Maybe they should find a CEO more sympathetic to their causes that is willing to take a lesser amount.
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#7 Old 01-16-2004, 07:19 PM
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The ASPCA is a New York-specific group which oversees a NY law-enforcement division (you may see them on Animal Planet's "Animal Cops" show) and certain NY shelters.

I have certain problems with the ASPCA. First, I believe they waste money. Within a year's time, my household will recieve 20+ fundraising mailings from this group, all containg the exact same letter (a story about a starving dog) they have been sending out for at least 4 years, and a sheet of (often misspelled) address labels. You expect any major charity to engage in some fundraising, but this is excessive and ridiculous, in my view.

My second problem with the ASPCA is their tiptoeing around virtually every animal issue that doesn't involve pets. In order to please their conservative donor base, controversial issues are avoided. Before their website underwent a revamping a while ago, the ASPCA confined their position on the meat industry to a statement along the lines of "eating meat is everyone's choice" , making a few weak statements in support of "humanely farmed" meat, and tiptoed around the animal research issue, offering a link to a pro-vivisection group that virulently attacks the animal movement. In the early 90's, the ASPCA was criticized for partnering with the greyhound racing industry to promote adoptions of retired racers; critics said it simply lent good PR to the industry without addressing the greyhounds who are killed on breeding farms. The ASPCA also reportedly claimed vegetarians can eat chicken and fish, and fired a director in the 80s for supporting vegetarianism.

Whether the ASPCA has changed their mind is hard to know; their website instructs viewers to email them for their position on animal welfare issues.



The HSUS is the nation's largest animal-related group. Historically, they have also been slow to come out with strong positions on controversial issues, but at least they are not as conservative as the ASPCA.

The HSUS makes clear its opposition to fur, whaling, factory farms, sport hunting, cockfighting, circuses, dolphin "trick" shows and the like. HSUS spokespeople have said it is not a "vegetarian organization," something that I suspect has a lot to do with not angering its more conservative donors. However, at least its website offers vegetarian recipes and often asks readers to reduce or eliminate their consumption of animal products. The HSUS does not run shelters, but it accredits them and trains shelter workers, and publishes the shelter community's major trade magazine.

The HSUS has had good success with ballot initiatives, which it sometimes works in conjunction with local grassroots advocates to pass a measure against cockfighting or bear baiting. It is for this reason that hardline consumptive use groups often hate the HSUS...they are one of the few groups that challenge the hunter/trapper stranglehold on the political process. Consumptive users typically try to flood various companies with protests if they hear they are partnering with the HSUS in a pet-saving scheme. Most outrageously, they tried to end PETsMART's partnership with the HSUS in a program that sends vets to poor communities and Indian reservations. Sort of gives you perspective on the kill em and grill em crowd.

That said, I don't typically donate to the HSUS except when I am purchasing informational booklets or videos for distribution. I feel it is a large enough organization and has enough reserves my donation is more needed at much smaller groups like COK.

But anyway..I'd suggest visiting the websites and deciding for yourself. www.aspca.og www.hsus.org

Sorry if I talked to much, but organizations are kind of my forte.

slops, gloops, and gruels.
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#8 Old 01-16-2004, 08:16 PM
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Not all humane societies euthanize animals. None of the local ones around here do, unless the animal is sick beyond repair. One summer we amputated a leg on one cat, and an eye on another for the humane society. They do seem to work pretty hard to keep things alive and healthy. One of the shelters has had some of the same dogs living there for 5+ yrs. While thats horrible for the dogs as far as not ever having a family, they still take good care of them and don't kill them cause no one wants them.

Bottom line is I think euthanasia policies vary from shelter to shelter.

http://megatarian.blogspot.com
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#9 Old 01-16-2004, 08:20 PM
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What do they do with them when they're overcrowded?



Our no-kill shelter (the one I volunteer at) turns a lot of people away and has a large waiting list, because the shelter is full and so are the foster homes. So those people end up taking them to an open-access shelter, but those are just as full. They adopt out a lot, they have some in foster, they send some to rescues, but still they end up having to euthanize. I don't know what suggestions to offer. I keep up on Best Friend's No More Homeless Pets and appreciate the advice they offer there.
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#10 Old 01-17-2004, 01:33 PM
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FWIW --



Any shelter can call itself a "Humane Society" or "SPCA". There are no governing bodies over shelters other than whatever oversight local communities, counties and states might have. It's confusing b/c so many shelters use those terms, which (mis)leads us into thinking there might be a national org. overseeing things or mandating certain regulations.
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#11 Old 01-17-2004, 02:48 PM
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Something that might make you upset w/ HSUS:

They are doing a show here called "superdogs" - which is dogs doing tricks apparently, but guess who HSUS got to sponsor it? Our friends at proctor and gamble with IAMS.
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#12 Old 01-17-2004, 08:00 PM
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That's good that IAMs supports local shelters and the Humane Society. I know they donate a lot of food as well. I'm glad they're taking steps in the right direction.
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#13 Old 01-18-2004, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anndr0id View Post

Something that might make you upset w/ HSUS:

They are doing a show here called "superdogs" - which is dogs doing tricks apparently, but guess who HSUS got to sponsor it? Our friends at proctor and gamble with IAMS.



Too bad not enough people will be upset at HSUS for this. They're a welfare org, though, not really AR. Unfortunately, most people are welfarists, not rightists, so this won't matter much.



IAMS is a horrible, horrible company. Corporate cruelty, just like their parent company, P&G.
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#14 Old 01-18-2004, 08:15 PM
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A strange twist: The hardline consumptive users are telling their followers to protest to IAMS for associating itself with a "radical AR group."

slops, gloops, and gruels.
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#15 Old 01-20-2004, 12:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anndr0id View Post

Wow, if a CEO of a non-profit can make 300,000, I wonder what the CEO of a profit driven company makes???



According to http://www.charitynavigator.org, CEO of the American Humane Society, Timothy O'Brien, only made $197,125 last Fiscal Year.



Three hundred thousand a year is still VERY low on the CEO scale. For comparison, check: http://www.aflcio.org/corporateameri...u/database.cfm



For instance, the CEO of the company I work for technically isn't even taking a salary, and hasn't been for at least two years. However, including options, his compensation for 2002 was $5,421,163. And this is a company that lost billions, not millions but billions, of dollars over a three year period.



In 2002, Robert A. Eckert of Mattel, Inc. (that's right, the TOY company) made $14,461,540 in total compensation including stock options.

And he still holds another $23,700,000 in unexercised stock options from previous years.



I clicked around randomly througha bunch of listings and found that most CEOs seem to make at least a million per year, and the lowest amount I was able to find was around $200,000.
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#16 Old 01-20-2004, 01:17 AM
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I'm not familiar with the American Humane Society and nothing came up when I searched by that name. The governing branch in the US is the Humane Society of the United States and their CharityNavigator link is http://www.charitynavigator.org/inde...orgid/3848.htm



I realize $300k is pretty small for the average CEO, but when compared with other non-profit organizations it is pretty high. Generally you don't enter this field of work to become rich. (As contrast, the president of PETA earns 35k/year.) But I tend to think the organization wanted to hire someone that was capable of steering the organization forward instead of someone with lots of compassion but little skill, and they had to pay out money to get someone skilled enough. I don't know.
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#17 Old 01-20-2004, 01:30 AM
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edit that, I found the organization you were refering to. The American Humane Association. Had never heard of it before, but they do seem to have a large budget. Visiting their website it seems to be aimed at protecting animals and children.
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#18 Old 01-20-2004, 07:50 PM
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Yeah, the AHA's major program is monitoring animal treatment on movie sets. Their trademark logo and "no animals were harmed..." appear at the end of films they approve.

slops, gloops, and gruels.
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#19 Old 01-20-2004, 11:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

edit that, I found the organization you were refering to. The American Humane Association. Had never heard of it before, but they do seem to have a large budget. Visiting their website it seems to be aimed at protecting animals and children.



Sorry about that. I'm cutting back on coffee, and my brain isn't working as well as it ought to be right now. LOL,
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