Should i eat meat? - VeggieBoards - A Vegetarian Community
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 01-16-2006, 09:58 AM
Beginner
 
Tammera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 5
ive been vegitarian for about 12 years now, i eat eggs and dairy. for quite a while ive always been tired and found it hard to get up and basically exhausted. i went to the doctors a few times and they found nothing wrong. i then took a friend to an alternate therapist (kinesiologist) that had help my autistic daughter by telling me she was sugar intollerant, so i removed sugar from her diet and there was an overnight change, now she has small amounts of sugar in her diet and she seems fine with that. so i took my friend and agreed to go myself to, and we was both told we cant eat wheat amongst a few other things (sugar coffee milk) i cut all of it out and felt so much better very fast. after about 5 or 6 months i felt so depressed because i felt my diet was restricted so much i couldnt eat anything all i was eating was rice and potatoes some veg, and fruit. i went back about 4 months ago and said i cant cope like this should i start eating meat, she knew i didnt want to so after she retested and found i was ok again with coffee milk and sugar, she gave me some great recipes which gave me a new boost and i was fine again, the new recipes mainly consisted of bean's (haricot, butter, kidney, chickpeas etc) the following day after my first meal she recommended i was so windy it smelt terrible, my bed smelt, my clothes smelt chair everything, it was gross, i tried with the recipes for a week or two hoping it would stop but it didnt, so i stopped eating them. my new boost went fast, although i still dont drink coffee, i smoke now after 8 years of quitting, i stink like an ashtray and hate it, ive also started biting my nails again after stopping 14 years ago. i struggle not eating chocolate, i started making wheat free muesli which is nice but im sure its not allowing me to lose weight, so im back to my ready break. i feel my whole diet consists of potatos, and rice, veg and fruit again, and im getting sick of the sight of them now, everytime i go food shopping i feel ill walking through the shop. the worst part is im now putting on weight, because ive started with the chocolate and chip shop chips again (because im starting to hate food now and cant bare to make another potato or rice)before i started eating bad food i was just maintaining weight and im obese so need to lose weight. i dont know whether it was because i wasnt eating enough food so my body wasnt burning therefore i was just maintaining.

in england most vegi foods consist of wheat.



its funny because how many times has a meat eater said to you, you know if you was on a desert island and had nothing to eat would you eat animals then or if you was starving would you and i could always say no and mean it. ive tried hard with this wheat thing for almst a year because i didnt want to start eating meat again, hoping that like the coffee and milk, the intollerance would go, but its not going. if i was by myself i would happily persist but i have my daughter now and my lack of motivation and moods are affecting her now.



i really dont know what to do. i asked my daughters theropist who is also vegi, whether she would eat meat if she was in my shoes and she said yes. but after 12 years i feel im failing myself like i have with the smoking. this year was the first christmas since being vegi that i sat there with my potatoes and veg and was looking at the meat and drooling.



im not a strong anti meat person i just felt not eating it was doing my bit for the animals, but i cook meat for family and some friends that visit, my daughter now eats meat, shes 7 years old now i brought her up vegi and always said i would let her choose when she knew what she was eating, when she had her first school visit to a farm i told her them cute chickens and lambs is what meat is, if you want to eat it you can, she chose to eat it, at first it was to upset me, because she used to say look mummy im eating a dead animal with a big smile, but it didnt bother me as not only is it part of her autism but i didnt actually mind her eating meat. after she realised i wasnt bothered she a few times said she wants to be vegi but it lasts a day so ill leave her to it.



what do you think?
Tammera is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 01-16-2006, 10:47 AM
Beginner
 
zoebird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 8,451
ultimately, you can only make this decision on your own.



but, i recommend that you consider diversifying your foods first--perhaps returning to your previous vegetarian diet and working on not smoking. Then, once you're there, go and talk to a vegetarian nutritionist about what sorts of options you have for boosting energy.



also, do you exercise? often, exercise increases our sense of having energy.
zoebird is offline  
#3 Old 01-16-2006, 11:11 AM
Beginner
 
Tesseract's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5,691
I agree with zoebird-- it sounds like your diet may be more limited than it really needs to be, and exercise could be a major missing link.



If it's the gluten in the wheat that is the problem, there are many gluten free wheat products available here in the US, including an entire line of them from Bob's Red Mill. I don't know what kinds of gluten-free products are available in the UK, but you can also order Bob's Red Mill products online.



There are also many other grains that a lot of vegetarians enjoy, including barley, quinoa, buckwheat/kasha, oats, corn/maize, millet, spelt, teff, kamut... many of these grains are probably most easily found either online, at health food stores, or at ethnic groceries.



Also, Quorn products seem to be popular in Europe and the UK, and I think they're wheat-free.



What about soy? It sounds like you're either not eating it at all, or eating very little. Soy foods like tofu and tempeh can help liven up a boring diet as well as being very nutritious and high in protein.



Your problem with beans seems unusually bad, but there are things that can be done to reduce the fart factor. I posted this tip on beans last week-- be sure to check the links at the bottom for more info.

http://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...5&postcount=91



But I also agree with zoebird, that ultimately, only you can decide whether you feel better (both physically and mentally) eating meat versus not eating meat.
Tesseract is offline  
#4 Old 01-16-2006, 11:11 AM
Beginner
 
DreamInWhispers's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 23
I would make sure all other options are exhausted before making the decision to go back to eating meat. There has to be an alternative that just hasn't been found yet.



I agree that exercise may be helpful if you aren't on a regular fitness plan. I couldn't begin to explain the change in my own energy levels since I started a regular program.



Most of all, I hope you find a solution that works best for your health.
DreamInWhispers is offline  
#5 Old 01-16-2006, 11:21 AM
Beginner
 
madder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 469
I agree with all of the above posts.



If you're looking for variety in your diet, you should try out some of the grains Tesseract mentioned. You could also try rice noodles (available in Asian shops) and there are a lot of wheat free pastas, breads etc. available in supermarkets and healthfood shops. Tesco has a 'Free from' range - check that out, some of the stuff is quite good (for gluten free, etc.)



If you're looking for something protein-y, try tofu - it can be a bit tricky (and hit-and-miss) until you learn how to cook it to your liking, but we can give you a few pointers on that if you like.



Quorn stuff is good too - as far as I know there isn't any wheat in that (though I could be wrong).



Maybe you could try introducing beans a small amount at a time, maybe one meal a week, to see how you get on.



Good luck!
madder is offline  
#6 Old 01-16-2006, 11:31 AM
Banned
 
xx22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 171
tammera,



each egg has 300 mg of cholesterol

represents 32 hours a chicken was in a 3x1 ft jail with 5 to 8 others

120 gallons of production water



meat is addictive



vegetarians get life insurance discounts



GOD give you and all of us grace
xx22 is offline  
#7 Old 01-16-2006, 11:35 AM
Banned
 
xx22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 171
mervyn hardinge md isocaloric studies



given the same amount of calories daily, after 3 months

nonvegetarians weigh most... 11 lbs more than dairy vegetarians

and 23 lbs more than vegans



fruitarians not in the study weighed less than any other group
xx22 is offline  
#8 Old 01-16-2006, 11:48 AM
Beginner
 
Tammera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 5
most quorn products contain wheat as the main ingrediant, i think just the quorn pieces dont and thats mushroom. alot of the free from stuff in tesco and such places are very expensive the cheapest bread is £2.00 and its got about 8 slices half the size of normal bread, i cant justify spending that being a single mum, i did get bread flour thats slighly cheaper and you get a bit more bread its not nice but its edible with cheese, my machine broke i have to get a new one. although i would be very interested on what i can do with grains and stuff other than make muesli, when i have more time ill read the posts and look at links better. ill look into the soy stuff, tofu is disgusting im sorry but it is, if you have some tips on making it nicer please tell me.



thanks again when i have more time, ill reply better i have to go out in a bit.
Tammera is offline  
#9 Old 01-16-2006, 11:58 AM
Beginner
 
madder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tammera View Post

most quorn products contain wheat as the main ingrediant, i think just the quorn pieces dont and thats mushroom. alot of the free from stuff in tesco and such places are very expensive the cheapest bread is £2.00 and its got about 8 slices half the size of normal bread, i cant justify spending that being a single mum, i did get bread flour thats slighly cheaper and you get a bit more bread its not nice but its edible with cheese, my machine broke i have to get a new one. although i would be very interested on what i can do with grains and stuff other than make muesli, when i have more time ill read the posts and look at links better. ill look into the soy stuff, tofu is disgusting im sorry but it is, if you have some tips on making it nicer please tell me.



thanks again when i have more time, ill reply better i have to go out in a bit.



Hi Tammera - sorry, didn't realise that about the Quorn.



Quorn pieces are good in sauces (I can give you a recipe for a korma I used to make when I ate eggs).



Rice noodles from Asian markets are relatively cheap.



You can cook most of the grains like rice (it would give you a bit of a change!) If you google them you will come up with lots of recipes.



Yep, tofu can be disgusting!



If you slice it fairly thinly and fry for a good while in veg oil and soy sauce until the outside goes crispy, it's very good (I promise!).



Also, if you freeze it and then thaw it before cooking, it goes kinda 'spongey' (I know, not the tastiest description, but it is good!) and is good in sauces like curry etc.



Have you tried TVP? Super cheap (I get a big bag of it for about 1) and you can make chilli, savoury mince, etc. with that.
madder is offline  
#10 Old 01-16-2006, 12:02 PM
Beginner
 
Tesseract's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5,691
I'm starting to think Quorn is formulated very differently in the UK and Europe than in the US. Here in the US, the first three ingredients in my Quorn are mycoprotein, egg whites, and whey powder or something like that. I think all the rest of the ingredients are "2% or less" so if it has wheat it doesn't have very much. Just for clarification, mycoprotein is made from fungus, but it is not mushroom that I'm aware of. Does it bother you that it's made from fungus, or is that another food you can't eat?



I'm looking in a couple of my cookbooks, and there are some really yummy-sounding recipes using alternative grains, like:



Savory Amaranth Porridge

Barley Risotto with Wild Mushrooms and Fresh Herbs

Walnut-Crusted Millet and Celery Root Croquettes

Baked Polenta with Red Beans and Fresh Tomatoa Salsa

Pesto Polenta with Sauteed Portobello Slices

India-Spiced Quinoa with Raisins and Pine Nuts

Quinoa and Pan-fird Corn with Orange Zest and Chives

Spicy Teff Griddle Cakes

Indonesian-Style Rice with Tempeh

Oven-Baked Three-Grain Casserole with Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Vegetables

Tesseract is offline  
#11 Old 01-16-2006, 12:17 PM
Beginner
 
meatless's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 5,670
Cut 1/2 a block of tofu into several equal pieces. Place on a dishtowel that covers both sides and set something heavy on it. Leave for 20 minutes. Then, cut into small cubes (1/2 inch by 1/2 inch or so). In a bowl, mix together (all approx.) about 1/3 c soy sauce (wheat free if your allergy is that bad), 1/4 cup balsalmic vinegar, two tablespoons of grated ginger, and 1 cup of water. Put the tofu in, cover the bowl and leave overnight.



Chop up a bunch of your favorite vegetables (I use red pepper, zucchini and broccoli). Spoon the tofu into a frying pan that has some oil in it. Cook on medium high heat until the tofu is quite browned on several sides. In another pan, cook up the vegetables. When they are almost cooked, whisk a tablespoon of corn starch into the marinade, and dump some of it in with the vegetables until it thickens. Throw in the finished tofu, toss, and serve over rice.



I used to hate tofu too, until I learned how to cook it properly!





Another excellent way to eat it is to cut it into strips (half an inch by 3 inches by 1/4 inch), sautee it in oil, and then when it's browned splash in some soy or tamari sauce and toss.
meatless is offline  
#12 Old 01-16-2006, 01:10 PM
Beginner
 
madder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesseract View Post

I'm starting to think Quorn is formulated very differently in the UK and Europe than in the US. Here in the US, the first three ingredients in my Quorn are mycoprotein, egg whites, and whey powder or something like that.



Yep I think it's pretty much the same over here (Europe) - the 'pure' quorn stuff is wheat free, but sausages etc. has wheat.



e.g. 'Chicken style' pieces : Mycoprotein (87%), rehydrated free range egg white, flavouring (from http://www.quorn.co.uk//cmpage.aspx?...1&productid=55)



But sausages : Mycoprotein (34%), rehydrated free range egg white, water, textured wheat protein (wheat protein, wheat starch), onion, flavouring (with colours: iron oxides), milk proteins, rapeseed oil, tapioca starch, pea fibre, gelling agent: pectin. (from http://www.quorn.co.uk//cmpage.aspx?...8&productid=35)
madder is offline  
#13 Old 01-16-2006, 01:15 PM
Beginner
 
Tesseract's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5,691
We don't have all that stuff over here! We basically just have nuggets, patties, and "Naked Cutlets" (equivalent of a chicken breast). I think I might have seen roast and a BBQ bucket at whoel Foods. But all those flavored escalopes, sausages, and things that mimic lamb and pork? No way!
Tesseract is offline  
#14 Old 01-16-2006, 01:25 PM
Beginner
 
madder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tesseract View Post

We don't have all that stuff over here! We basically just have nuggets, patties, and "Naked Cutlets" (equivalent of a chicken breast). I think I might have seen roast and a BBQ bucket at whoel Foods. But all those flavored escalopes, sausages, and things that mimic lamb and pork? No way!



Aw!! You'll have to come over and try them



It's even sadder for me, looking at them on the website, since only the 'basics' were around when I was still eating eggs - so I never got to try them!



madder is offline  
#15 Old 01-16-2006, 01:35 PM
Beginner
 
sproutsfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 132
I don't know of any nutrients that can't be found in vegetarian/vegan food, though it's true that there are higher concentrations of some in meat than in plant products, so more care may be needed to ensure all requirements are met. Some conditions and lifestyles mean that people need a different balance of nutrients to what is recommended to the general population. Smoking, I think I've read, is one of the things that increases the amount of some vitamins needed in the diet - I think it's B vitamins. A lack of these may explain the fatigue. I've never looked into it though as I'm not a smoker, so you'd have to check that. Some additives and pesticides in processed food may also be responsible for diminishing the effects of nutrients in our bodies, so we get deficiency symptoms despite actually consuming what is recommended. Omega 3 fatty acids are among those that can be counter-acted by unnatural food ingredients. There is some research going on looking into the possibility that conditions such as autism are caused by genetic digestive abnormalities, meaning that some people's reactions to these chemicals are more extreme than most because they don't break them down to the extent that others do. You may find this interesting to research. Although you're not posting about your daughter's diet, as you're closely related you could also have dietary sensitivities, perhaps. Either way, things that are especially bad for some people are usually mildly bad for everyone else, so I try to limit my intake of hydrogenated oils, MSG etc anyway.



There's an informative article here: http://nutrition.about.com/od/guesta.../a/cfarlow.htm



Hope some of that helps
sproutsfan is offline  
#16 Old 01-16-2006, 04:15 PM
Beginner
 
Tammera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 5
again i havent got much time but that last post has name me thing, i havent read the link i will tomorrow as its bed time, but apparently people with intollerances, because its not an allergy people dont always realise they have it because the sideeffects from them have gradually started, its when they stop eating it they notice the difference, and when they eat it again you get quite alot iller than before. most intollerances as you said your body cannot digest the food properly and with wheat intollerance you start being ill about 5 days later which again doesnt help when your not sure whats wrong.

most children that have autism have alot of food intollerances and/or allergies, so it wouldnt suprise me if it is connected to being in the womb. i always wondered if it was because of the birth she was like she is, but no one knows why it happens, maybe one day things will change.



as for american vegi food (assuming it was america that was mentioned lacking) i go there regularly because my dad lives there, and yes it lacks bigtime, over here mc d's even have lovely quorn burgers, but and a big BUT you have vegi corn dogs, they are worth being ill for
Tammera is offline  
#17 Old 01-16-2006, 04:46 PM
Beginner
 
Trueveggie14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,112
Hi Tammera: Hope this helps!!!



I have found a website that will sell you the Wheat-free pastas for £1.99



It may sound like a bit of money but youd be saving on the drive to and from the grocery store. They say if you order £30.00 worth of dry goods they will deliver anywhere on the mainland UK for free.



Im actually jealous because they wont ship to the US and they have many, many vegan options including deserts, pastas, beans, cereals, dried fruit, household cleaning products all delivered right to your door.



Anyway.. check it out here http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-...t/options.html



Use the options drop down menus to set your view to only Wheat Free . You can also set another dietary need like Vegan, Caffeine free, gluten free, etc

After you set your Dietary options: search away. Look under Grocery then on the side menu youll see pastas, beans, etc



Also, many people who are depressed and tired for no apparent reason are B complex deficient. If all you are eating is potatoes, rice and veggies --- you probably arent getting enough.





Foods to EAT When Depressed

Foods high in B1. B1 is essential for energy production, nerve cell function and carbohydrate metabolism. Good sources of B1 include soybeans, brown rice, sunflower seeds, wholes wheat and Brewers yeast.



Foods high in B6 B6 is important in maintaining hormone balance, immune function and is involved in the formation and use of neurotransmitters. Good sources of B6 include Brewers yeast, whole grains, legumes, bananas, seeds, nuts, potatoes, Brussels sprouts and cauliflowers.



Foods high in Folate and B12 Folate & B12 deficiency tend to decrease SAMe levels which is associated with depression. Good sources of folate and B12 include Brewers yeast, green leafy vegetables, low fat dairy and whole grains. Supplementation with folate and B12 can also increase serotonin levels.



Foods high in Vitamin C Vitamin C increases immune functions and is important to the production of neurotransmitter production. Good sources of Vitamin C can be found in kale, parsley, collard greens, turnips, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, red chili peppers, mustard greens, fresh fruits including kiwi, strawberries and citrus of all kinds.



Foods high in Amino Acids Tryptophan is a precursor to serotonin and melatonin. Tyrosine is a precursor to norepinephine and may stimulate thyroid hormone synthesis. Good sources of foods rich in amino acids include eggs, and low fat dairy. Choose organic and minimally processed.



Essential Fatty Acids (EFA) Numerous studies have found that low levels of essential fatty acids can lead to depression. Good sources of EFAs include flax seed oil, borage seed oil, and pumpkin seeds. Supplementation can also be helpful. Choose a supplement with EPA, DHA,GLA and Vitamin E (a natural preservative) Refrigerate to decrease chances of spoilage.



Other helpful foods Garlic, Lecithin (good "brain" food), beans, pods, raw fruits and vegetables and tofu (if not sensitive to it).





Good Recipes once you get yourself some Rice, corn, spinach, millet or Quinoa pasta http://www.goodnessdirect.co.uk/cgi-...sect/FPNW.html \\

you can make Baked Ziti or Garlic, Kale, Tomato Spaghetti





Vegan Baked Ziti



Ingredients:

1 1lb box of Ziti pasta or Rigatoni

6 slices of Tofutti mozzarella "Cheese"

8 oz. of Nasoya firm tofu

1 1/2 jars of tomato sauce (I prefer one with garlic, onion and bell peppers - but get what you like)

3 tsp. of Ener-G egg replacer

4 tbsp warm water

Garlic, Oregano and salt



Preheat oven to 350. Fill large spaghetti pot with cold water. Bring to boil. Pour in ziti and cook for 10 minutes - stirring occasionally. (I always add a dab of olive oil to keep them from sticking) Drain and rinse under cool water. In medium bowl mix your Ener-G egg replacer and warm water. Stir it good. Now mix in the tofu. Set aside. Pour a light layer of sauce in large casserole or lasagna pan ( I use glass Pyrex dish 4.8L). Place drained ziti noodles in the pan. Mix in the tofu / Ener-G. Pour in some more sauce. Add the garlic powder, oregano and salt. Break up the 6 slices of mozzarella into little pieces and mix them in. Once all of your ingredients are in the baking pan, cover with aluminum foil and bake for 20 minutes. After 20 min. remove the aluminum foil and continue to bake until the mozzarella is melted.



Serves 4 - 6 people (or one person for a week.)





Garlic, Kale, Tomato Spaghetti (Rabid_Childs recipe)



Rabid_Child:

I love Kale sauteed in garlic and olive oil with either halved cherry or grape tomatoes (cooked until soft) or a can of diced tomatoes, then tossed with pasta and fresh basil. Sprinkle on a little sea salt, and mm mm good!





Both have been tested and are very yummy.

--------- I would never eat meat, but as everyone has said this has to be your decision. We have given you many new options that maybe you didn't know about before. One pound of spaghetti (non-wheat) costs about $3.00 US or 1.75 GBP but One pound of flesh costs a lot more literally and figuratively!!!
Trueveggie14 is offline  
#18 Old 01-17-2006, 08:09 PM
Beginner
 
chocsoymilk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 160
But what about Quorn causing seizures, memory loss, violent allergic reactions (abdomial cramps, nausea, vomiting?)



Why is it that EVERYONE is now allergic to wheat? I find a new person who's allergic to wheat on pretty much a weekly basis. Is this something new, or has it been going on for generations, just undiagnosed?



Or could it be the genetic modifications to and pesticides on the wheat we're now consuming?



It seems really odd to me.
chocsoymilk is offline  
#19 Old 01-17-2006, 08:48 PM
Beginner
 
Tesseract's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 5,691
Quote:
Originally Posted by chocsoymilk View Post

But what about Quorn causing seizures, memory loss, violent allergic reactions (abdomial cramps, nausea, vomiting?)



Why is it that EVERYONE is now allergic to wheat? I find a new person who's allergic to wheat on pretty much a weekly basis. Is this something new, or has it been going on for generations, just undiagnosed?



Or could it be the genetic modifications to and pesticides on the wheat we're now consuming?



It seems really odd to me.

I haven't seen any documentation showing that more than a few hundred people (out of probably hundreds of thousands, and maybe even millions who've been using it over the years it's been on the market) have had any kind of problem with Quorn. Quorn doesn't seem to be any more allergenic than plenty of other foods. for any given food, you can find someone out there who will get sick on it.



I'm pretty sure wheat has been a major digestive problem for as long as humans have been eating wheat. From what I've read about it, wheat and related grains have been one of the last foods added to the human diet, and the human digestive system still hasn't caught up.
Tesseract is offline  
#20 Old 01-18-2006, 10:18 AM
Beginner
 
Coney's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,854
I usually put 1/2 tsp of vinegar in with one can of beans when I cook them. It helps get the air out. You can also take a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar every morning. I knew a vegetarian who did that every day and never had problems with gas.



Dill added to cooked beans will help. I guess the gas problem comes from the beans not being able to properly digest, but dill is a digestive for beans. I haven't tried it, but I've read about it in a few different places. You can try the vinegar/dill thing with beans and see if it helps.



Have you looked on VegWeb.com for recipes? There are tons there. It seems you need a totally new menu or you'll start eating meat again just for variety sake.



Rice noodles are good, you can make Thai, Chinese, Italian, whatever you want from them.



Have spices on hand, like curry mixes, thai spices (Thai Kitchen brand has green and red curry in a jar. All you have to do is add some soy sauce to veggies/noodles or rice, and you've got a fantastic tasting meal.), so you have some kind of variety handy. I know how boring it can get if you don't change up your food sometimes.
Coney is offline  
#21 Old 01-18-2006, 10:25 AM
Beginner
 
Coney's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,854
Oh! Soups, Chilis, and Stews...endless ideas there for meals:



http://www.vegan-food.net/index.cgi?soup

http://vegweb.com/recipes/soup/
Coney is offline  
#22 Old 01-18-2006, 06:32 PM
Beginner
 
Alfiedog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,905
I'm surprised that no one has brought up the smoking. I'm trying to quit so believe me I know how hard it is, but as you started smoking after 8 years of quitting that has got to affect you.
Alfiedog is offline  
#23 Old 01-18-2006, 06:48 PM
Beginner
 
Trueveggie14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfiedog View Post

I'm surprised that no one has brought up the smoking. I'm trying to quit so believe me I know how hard it is, but as you started smoking after 8 years of quitting that has got to affect you.





The only way I was able to quit smoking (1 1/2 packs a day for 14 yrs) was with Zyban and a desire to quit for myself and no one else. You have to have a doctor's prescription for that. Take that 3 months and cigarette smoke will nausseate you.



Anyway, she's asking for help with her diet first. We care about her health, but she has to want to quit smoking in order to quit. No one can force her.
Trueveggie14 is offline  
#24 Old 01-18-2006, 07:08 PM
Beginner
 
Alfiedog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 2,905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trueveggie14 View Post




Anyway, she's asking for help with her diet first. We care about her health, but she has to want to quit smoking in order to quit. No one can force her.



Surprisingly, I could actually read what she said and I realize that she was asking for help on her diet. I was wondering if the smoking could be an influence on the way she was feeling as well as nicotine can work as a depressant. So I don't see any reason why the smoking should not be mentioned.
Alfiedog is offline  
#25 Old 01-19-2006, 09:02 AM
Beginner
 
zoebird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 8,451
actually, i did mention the smoking, but whatever.
zoebird is offline  
#26 Old 01-19-2006, 09:12 AM
Beginner
 
carnelian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 4,965
No.
carnelian is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off